Enforcement

Evangeline Parish Man Sentenced In Federal Court for Baited Field

Release Date: 12/01/2011

 

An Evangeline Parish man was sentenced on Nov. 29, 2011 in U.S. Court in Lafayette for migratory game bird violations.

U.S. District Judge Patrick Hanna sentenced Jody D. Fontenot, 42, of Ville Platte to pay a $550 fine, complete 50 hours of community service and one-year suspension of his hunting rights or until his 50 hours of community service was complete.  Fontenot pleaded guilty to hunting doves over a baited field and aiding and abetting others in taking doves over a baited field.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited Fontenot in September of 2011 after receiving a complaint about a baited field near Jean Pierre Road in Evangeline Parish.

Agents went to the field on Sept. 3, 2011 and located rice that was distributed throughout the field.  Agents went back to the baited field owned by Fontenot on Sept. 4 and found the field being hunted by three adults and six juveniles including Fontenot.

Fontenot was found to be responsible for the placement of the bait.  Agents seized a total of 32 doves in the case.

U.S. Assistant District Attorney Howard Parker prosecuted the case.  Agents involved in the case were Lt. Jesse Savoie, Sgt. Scott D. Fontenot, Sgt. Keith Aucoin and Senior Agent Danon Maricle.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

Louisiana Becomes First State to Adopt National Boat Training Curriculum for Marine Law Enforcement Officers

Release Date: 11/18/2011

Louisiana Becomes First State to Adopt National Boat Training Curriculum for Marine Law Enforcement Officers
Louisiana Becomes First State to Adopt National Boat Training Curriculum for Marine Law Enforcement Officers

November 18, 2011 The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division (LDWF) became the first agency in the United States to receive both state and national accreditation in the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) Boat Operations and Training (BOAT) program.

According to NASBLA.org, the BOAT program establishes a national standard for the training and qualification of maritime law enforcement and rescue personnel.  Adoption and implementation of the BOAT program provides a true national standard for the purpose of maritime interoperability at the federal, state and local levels.  Standardization ensures maritime agencies can interact together and will bolster their ability to act as force multipliers nationwide.

"Agencies who choose to adopt this national standard of training can assure their ability to conduct missions on our nation’s waterways safely and effectively and operate seamlessly with their federal, state and local partners on the water," said John Fetterman, NASBLA's Director of Law Enforcement.

On Sept. 1, at NASBLA's Annual Conference in Milwaukee, LDWF was recognized as the first agency to receive national accreditation in the BOAT program.  On Nov. 17, the Louisiana Peace Officers Standard and Training (POST) Council accepted the NASBLA training curriculum in the BOAT program.  This action makes Louisiana the first state to adopt the BOAT program for all its marine law enforcement patrol officers.

The Louisiana POST Council is responsible for developing and evaluating the curriculum of mandatory basic training courses for municipal officers, deputy sheriffs, state police, LDWF agents and all other persons commissioned as peace officers defined by state law.

"Our goal was to be the first agency accredited with this new standard of training in the marine environment.  We now shift our focus to training other law enforcement agencies so that we are all on the same page when it comes to securing the maritime domain and providing safety on the waterways," said LDWF Lt. Col. Jeff Mayne, the state's Boating Law Administrator.

Through their partnership with NASBLA, LDWF will also offer BOAT program training courses for other state law enforcement entities in the near future.  To help shape the course, LDWF is asking for feedback from the law enforcement community; specifically how many of their marine patrol officers need the training and what part of the BOAT program they are interested in taking.  To offer feedback, please email Lt. Spencer Cole at scole@wlf.la.gov.

For more information on the NASBLA BOAT program, please visit www.nasbla.org and then hover over the training tab and click on the BOAT program link.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Two Men Cited For Fishing Violations In Plaquemines Parish

Release Date: 11/17/2011

 

A Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agent cited two men for alleged recreational fishing violations in Plaquemines Parish on Nov. 16.

Sgt. Adam Young cited Lee W. Pierce, 38, and Clay W. Mazyck Jr., 42, both of New Orleans, for taking over the daily limit of red drum and spotted sea trout in the Jefferson Lake Diversion in Point a la Hache.

After receiving a complaint and conducting surveillance in the area, Sgt. Young observed the two men actively fishing and then leaving the area.  Sgt. Young stopped them at the boat launch and found them in possession of 99 spotted seatrout and 15 red drum.  The daily limit for spotted sea trout is 25 per person per day, and the daily limit for red drum is 5 fish per person per day.

"This time of year agents spend most of their time in the woods monitoring hunting activity.  However, this case and others like it prove why it is important to continue to have a presence on the water enforcing fishing regulations in the fall and winter months," said Col. Winton Vidrine, head of the LDWF Enforcement Division.

Taking over the daily limit of red drum and spotted sea trout each carry a maximum fine of $350, or up to 60 days in jail or both plus court costs for each offense.  In addition, both men could be required to pay civil restitution for the illegally taken fish.

All of the fish were seized and donated to charity as per department policy. 

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

St. Bernard Parish Man Cited For Oyster Violations

Release Date: 11/16/2011

 

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited a commercial oyster vessel captain for alleged oyster violations on Nov. 11 in the Hopedale area.

Agents cited Clifford A. Derouen, 44, of Violet, for failing to fill out oyster tags and violating the oyster harvest sanitary code for refrigeration.

Agents received a complaint that a vessel was unloading oysters, which according to vessel logbooks were harvested on Nov. 9.  However, agents found the oysters were tagged as being harvested on Nov. 10.  Agents also determined that the oysters were not put under mechanical refrigeration before midnight of the day they were reported harvested as required.

Violation of the sanitary code for refrigeration carries a $25 fine and up to 15 days in jail.  Failing to fill out oyster tags correctly carries a fine up to $500 and up to 90 days in jail.

Agents returned 60 sacks of oysters to closed waters as per LDWF policy.

Agents participating in the case were Sgt. Adam Young, Sgt. Michael Garrity, Senior Agent Villere Reggio and Senior Agent Gary Pierce.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Four Louisiana Men Cited for Federal Fisheries Violations

Release Date: 11/15/2011

 

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents cited four men on Nov. 11 for alleged fisheries violations in federal waters.

Agents cited Hershel L. Girouard II, 39, of Youngsville, Shane P. Maturin, 30, of New Iberia, Adam J. Leonard Jr., 38, of Bourg, and George A. Venable, 29, of Church Point, for fishing for red snapper during a closed season and possessing over the limit of red snapper.  Girouard, Maturin and Leonard were also cited for failing to keep fish intact.

Agents boarded an offshore supply vessel approximately 70 miles offshore in federal waters.  Agents observed the four subjects fishing off the back deck of the vessel prior to boarding.

Agents seized 28 red snapper and one snowy grouper.  Agents found some of the red snapper with their heads and tails removed and a grouper with its tail removed.

The recreational season for red snapper was open from June 1, 2011 through July 18, 2011.  The daily possession limit for red snapper during the open season is two per person per trip.  The bag limit during the closed season is reduced to zero.

This case will be forwarded to the National Marine Fisheries Service for review.  The penalties associated with violating the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act will be determined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of the General Council.

Agents involved in the case were Lt. Bobby Buatt, Senior Agent Buddy Murray and Agent Justin Lowry.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Port Barre Man Arrested For DUI And Drug Violations

Release Date: 11/15/2011

 

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents arrested a Port Barre resident on Nov. 12 for alleged night hunting and drug violations in St. Landry Parish.

Agents observed Randy Guillory, 55, hunting wild quadrupeds off a public road outside of Part Barre.  Agents then stopped the truck being driven by Guillory.  Upon coming in contact with Guillory, agents found an illegal narcotic, methadone, and cited Guillory for driving a vehicle under the influence (DUI).

Agents charged Guillory with illegal possession of a schedule II narcotic in the presence of a firearm, DUI, hunting wild quadrupeds during illegal hours and discharging a firearm from a public road.  Guillory was booked into the St. Landry Parish Jail.

Illegal possession of schedule II drugs carries a fine up to $5,000 or jail time between two and five years.  Driving under the influence brings a fine of $300 to $1,000 and between 10 days and six months in jail.  Hunting from a public road and during illegal hours carries a fine between $250 and $500 and up to 90 days in jail for each offense.

Agents involved in the investigation were Senior Agents Ryan Faul and Channing Duval.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Ouachita Parish Man Sentenced In Federal Court For Wildlife Crimes

Release Date: 11/10/2011

A Ouachita Parish man was sentenced on Nov. 7 in U.S. Western District Court in Monroe for two counts of violating federal pesticide laws and one count of violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Leslie W. Hardwick Jr., 47, of West Monroe, was sentenced to pay a $5,035 fine, be on supervised probation for three years with no hunting privileges and six months of home confinement with electronic monitoring by U.S. District Judge Robert James.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited Hardwick in January 2011 after receiving a complaint that dead animals were being located in Ouachita and Richland parishes.  In Ouachita Parish, animals were found in the area of Bosco Lodge owned by Robert Stone and Sal Miletello.  In Richland Parish, animals were found south of Start on Two Stone Farms, which was also owned by Stone.  Bosco Lodge, a licensed deer pen in southeast Ouachita Parish, employed Hardwick.

Agents went to the areas and located a total of 54 dead animals four of which were migratory non-game birds.  The animals consisted of 17 coyotes, 16 raccoons, 12 opossums, four bobcats, a red tailed hawk, barred owl and two sparrows.

After finding the dead animals, a joint investigation began with LDWF, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Environmental Protection Agency.  During the investigation, agents located several areas baited with the insecticide known as Temik, which is a restricted use pesticide.

All 54 animals were sent to LSU veterinary school for analysis where it was found that all animals contained high levels of Temik in their digestive tracts.  During the interview with Hardwick, he stated that he had placed the bait sites laced with Temik to eradicate coyotes.

U.S. Assistant District Attorney Cytheria Jernigan prosecuted the case.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

LDWF Agents Cite Seven For Night Hunting Violations

Release Date: 11/09/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents cited seven individuals for alleged hunting violations in Red River Parish on Nov. 7.

LDWF was notified at approximately 4 a.m. by the Red River Parish Sheriff's Office about possible night hunting activities on La. Hwy 71 north of Coushatta.  Agents responded and made contact with the suspects and found two dead doe deer and a dead raccoon.

Dametry Caldwell, 19, of Coushatta; Adam Caldwell, 20, of Coushatta; Demarcus Atkins, 22, of Glostner; Sean Griffin, 22, of Natchitoches; Christian Campbell, 21, of Coushatta; Michael Powell, 35, of Mansfield; and Quinton Grant, 24, of Coushatta were all cited for hunting deer during illegal hours with artificial light, hunting from a moving vehicle and hunting from a public road.

Dametry Caldwell was also cited for discharging a firearm from a public road, hunting without resident hunting and big game licenses, possessing over the limit of deer and failing to comply with deer tagging requirements.  Adam Caldwell was also cited for discharging a firearm from a public road, hunting raccoons illegally and failing to comply with hunter safety regulations.

Agents believe the group began night hunting the previous day shortly after sunset.  The group had traveled several miles from Hall Summit to Lake End in Red River Parish.  The firearms used by the group varied from a high-powered rifle to a 12-gauge shotgun.

Hunting deer during illegal hours with an artificial light range brings a $900 to $950 fine, up to 120 days of imprisonment and forfeiture of anything seized.  Hunting from a moving vehicle carries a $250 to $500 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Hunting from a public road brings a $200 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.

Possessing over the limit of deer brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Failing to comply with deer tagging regulations carries a $200 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Hunting raccoons illegally brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Discharging a firearm from a public road carries up to a $50 fine and up to 30 days imprisonment.

Hunting without resident hunting or big game licenses brings a $50 fine and up to 15 days in jail for each offense.  Failing to comply with hunter safety regulations carries a $50 fine and up to 15 days in jail.

There could also be a civil restitution penalty for the two doe deer in the amount of $1,624 per deer and for the raccoon in the amount of $27.75.

Agents involved were Sgt. Chuck Dison, Sgt. Patrick Staggs, Senior Agent John Blalock and Red River Parish Sheriff's Office Lt. John Malfouz.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

tip411 Complaint Leads to Deer Hunting Citations

Release Date: 11/08/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited a Calcasieu Parish man on alleged deer hunting violations on Oct. 30.

LDWF agents received a tip411 complaint from the public on Oct. 19 about potential deer hunting violations that occurred in Allen Parish.

Agents cited Christopher Bailey, 46, for taking deer with an illegal weapon, using illegal methods, hunting without a big game license and failing to comply with deer tagging or harvest record regulations.

After investigating the tip411 complaint and interviewing Bailey, agents found that Bailey had been squirrel hunting when he took an 8-point buck using a semi-automatic shotgun with fine shot.  Bailey admitted to agents he shot the deer the day before the still hunt season opened in Area 8.  Agents also found that Bailey failed to possess a big game license or deer tags.

Taking deer with illegal methods brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail.  Taking deer using an illegal weapon carries a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Hunting without big game license brings a $50 fine and up to 15 days in jail.

Failing to comply with deer tagging or harvest record regulations brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Bailey may also be responsible for a civil restitution penalty of $1,624.61 for the replacement value of the deer.

Agents participating in this case were Sgt. Keith Aucoin and Senior Agent Danon Maricle.

LDWF launched the tip411 program at the end of September as a part of their Operation Game Thief program, which may offer a cash reward for information leading to arrests or convictions.

To use the tip411 program, citizens can text LADWF and their tip to 847411 or download the "LADWF Tips" iPhone app from the Apple iTunes store free of charge.   CitizenObserver, the tip411 provider, uses technology that removes all identifying information before LDWF receives the text so that LDWF cannot identify the sender.

Texting or downloading the app enables the public to send anonymous tips to LDWF and lets LDWF respond back, creating a two-way anonymous “chat”.  Users of the app or texters can also send in photos to help support their claim and be used as evidence.

Citizens can also call Operation Game Thief's Hotline at 1-800-442-2511.  The hotline and tip411 program are monitored 24 hours a day.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

Facebook User Cited For Over Limit Of Ducks

Release Date: 11/02/2011

 

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited a St. Charles Parish resident on Oct 27 for alleged migratory bird violations as a result of recent postings on his Facebook page.

Brandon Lowry, 19, of Norco, was cited for taking over the daily limit and two-day possession limit of teal.  Agents were informed of a photo taken during open teal season on Lowry’s Facebook profile showcasing 64 blue-winged teal ducks and 12 hunters.  Teal season ran from Sept. 10-25.

Agents then conducted an extensive investigation interviewing all 12 hunters and uncovering additional Facebook postings, which led them to believe that Lowry had shot over his daily and possession limits. 

After further questioning, Lowry admitted to investigators that he shot over the daily limit one day and shot his daily limit two other separate days.  The daily bag limit for teal during the special teal season is four teal per person per day with a two-day possession limit of eight.

The state penalties for migratory bird violations for having over the daily and possession limits are fines between $400 and $950, or up to 120 days in jail, or both plus court cost and forfeiture of anything seized for each offense.

LDWF Agent Jared Taylor was the lead investigative agent.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

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