General

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Biloxi

Information
Owned: 
Biloxi Marsh Land Corporation
Acreage: 
35,644 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
504-284-5267
Map: 

Description:
The Biloxi Wildlife Management Area is located in Upper St. Bernard Parish about 40 miles east of New Orleans. It is accessible only by boat via commercial launches at Hopedale and Shell Beach. The 35,644-acre tract is owned and leased to the Department by the Biloxi Marsh Lands Corporation. The area is a low brackish to saline marsh. A few oak trees are present on old ridges but the major vegetation includes marshhay cord grass, black rush, hog cane, smooth cord grass, saltgrass, glasswort, and three square. Widgeon grass is the main submerged aquatic plant occurring there.
A tremendous number of bayous, sloughs and potholes make the Biloxi tract an excellent producer of fish, shrimp, crabs, waterfowl, and furbearers. The few canal spoil banks and ridges scattered throughout the marsh provide escape for birds and mammals from rising water levels during storms or high tides. Game species hunted on the area include rabbits, rails, gallinules, snipe, ducks, and geese. Major ducks present in winter are lesser scaup, teal, wigeon, gadwall, shoveler, and mottled duck with lesser concentrations of pintail and mallard. Blue and snow geese are normally found on Biloxi although not in large numbers. Fur animals present include nutria, muskrat, mink, raccoon, otter, and opossum. Alligators are also found on the area.
Fish species common on the area include speckled trout, redfish, black drum, sheepshead, flounder, and croaker. Large catches of crabs and shrimp are often taken by both sportsmen and commercial fishermen.
Besides hunting and fishing, other forms of recreation available are boating, crabbing, shrimping, and bird watching.

Big Lake

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
19,231 Acres
Contact
Email: 
lmoak@wlf.la.gov
Phone: 
(318) 757-4571
Map: 

Description:
Big Lake Wildlife Management Area is located in Franklin, Madison, and Tensas Parishes, 12 miles east of Gilbert. Major access routes to the area are Louisiana Highways 4 and 610. The Department maintains a system of all-weather gravel roads throughout the area, and numerous ATV trails provide access to the interior of the area. Several hiking trails follow old pipeline rights-of-way.
Big Lake WMA is comprised of approximately 19,231 acres, including 7 small lakes with the largest approximately 160 acres in size. Six bayous flow through the area providing a total of approximately 25 miles of waterways.
Flat and generally poorly drained, the terrain varies from 55-65 feet mean sea level. Seasonal flooding occurs dependent on water levels with the Tensas River basin, but periodic flooding may occur anytime after periods of localized heavy rainfall.
Most of the forested component of the management area consists of relatively closed overstory canopy with a fairly dense understory. Timber value is moderate due to previous logging prior to acquisition by the department. Major timber species composing the overstory are Nuttall oak, overcup oak, willow oak, American elm, sweetgum, bitter pecan, green ash, hackberry, and honey locust. Other overstory species include willow, sycamore, persimmon, red maple, cypress, and box elder.
Understory species include rattan, grapevine, dewberry, blackberry, deciduous holly, swamp dogwood, and elderberry. Switchcane, baccharis, buttonbush, poison ivy, and greenbriar are also common.
Whitetailed deer, turkey, squirrels, rabbits, and raccoons, along with limited waterfowl and woodcock hunting opportunities can be found on the area. Deer and squirrel hunting opportunities are normally very good. Due to several excellent hatching years in the late 1990's, continuing through 2000-2002, wild turkey populations may have reached an all-time high. Specific habitat improvement projects completed by the department during this time have also helped the native turkey flock continue to grow. A youth lottery turkey hunt is held each year on the weekend prior to the regular turkey season.
Trapping for furbearers is allowed, and the species available are raccoon, otter, nutria, mink, beaver, bobcat, coyote, fox, and opossum. Alligator populations have also increased, and in 2002, a limited alligator hunting season was initiated. Five alligator tags are given to each successful hunter determined by a public lottery drawing held each summer.
Sport and commercial fishing are popular, limited only by the acreage of available water. Bass, bluegill, crappie, and catfish are caught by recreational fishermen, and commercial fishermen take carp, buffalo, drum, gar, and catfish. Four improved boat ramps have been constructed.
During the northward spring migration, Big Lake WMA is visited by dozens of species of passerine birds, and the area is a very popular birdwatching destination. Resident bird species are common throughout the year, and the diverse habitat types found on the area produce an assortment of birdwatching opportunities. The American Bird Conservancy has recognized Big Lake WMA in its Important Birding Areas Program.
Improvements to the Trusler Lake Nature Trail have been proposed, and when completed will provide a unique experience for nature lovers.
Additional information may be obtained from LDWF, P.O. Box 1640, Ferriday, LA 71334.

Big Colewa Bayou

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
899 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 343-4044

Description:
Received as a donation made available through federal bankruptcy proceedings, Big Colewa Bayou Wildlife Management Area consists of six separate units totaling 899 acres within West Carroll Parish. Most of the property was farmland prior to being acquired by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
The limited forest resource on the various tracts includes timber species such as willow oak, water oak, sweetgum, hackberry, sassafras, cedar elm, American elm, pignut hickory, and delta post oak. Bald cypress, green ash, bitter pecan, overcup oak, and black willow are found along small stream drainages. Principle understory and mid-story species are palmetto, rattan, greenbrier, trumpet creeper, poison ivy, peppervine, Japanese honeysuckle, hawthorn, deciduous holly, and swamp dogwood. Approximately 400 acres of agricultural land have been planted in hardwood trees by department personnel.
Archery hunting for deer is available along with rabbit hunting. The most popular sport on Big Colewa Bayou WMA is dove hunting in the sunflower fields planted by department employees on the Bearskin Unit of the WMA.
There are no camping areas on Big Colewa Bayou.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 368 CenturyTel Drive, Monroe, Louisiana 71203.

Bayou Pierre

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
2,212 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Description:
Bayou Pierre Wildlife Management Area is located in extreme northwest Red River and east-central Desoto Parishes, 20 miles south of Shreveport. Primary access routes to the area are Red River Parish Road 410 and Yearwood Road off of Louisiana Highway 1. The Department maintains a limited system of regular and restricted-use ATV trails. Parish maintained roads also provide access to and through the area.
Bayou Pierre WMA lies in the Red River Alluvial Valley and is comprised of approximately 2,212 acres with Bayou Pierre bisecting the area. The area contains soil that drains poorly and is subject to periodic annual flooding. The terrain is essentially flat with only a five feet change in elevation across the entire area. There are drainages, wet weather ponds, sloughs, reforested areas, grasslands and supplemental food plots that create habitat favorable to supporting a diversified wildlife community.
The original bottomland hardwood forest on the area was cleared and the area drained in an attempt to convert the area to farming during the mid-1900?s. Following several failed farming attempts the area was deeded to the Department in 1992.
The Department has developed wildlife habitat featuring four distinct types, a 160 acre moist soil waterfowl refuge, 800 acres in ridge and swale / reforested bottomland hardwoods, a 200 plus acres reforested hardwood area and the remaining acreage being managed in planted dove fields and open grasslands. The wildlife habitat on the area has benefited from several cooperative projects among the Department and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, Quail Unlimited, American Energy Producers and the USDA?s Natural Resources Conservation Service.
White-tailed deer, rabbits, squirrel, raccoon, snipe, waterfowl and dove hunting opportunities are available on the area. Deer, squirrel and raccoon hunting are limited due to the young age of the reforested hardwood area. Waterfowl hunting is very limited due to the small acreage and the Department?s effort to have the area serve as a migration refuge for waterfowl during the winter months. High concentrations of snipe use the area during late winter months when local rainfall allows for sheeting of shallow water and saturated soil conditions. Trapping is allowed on the area except in the waterfowl refuge. Dove hunting opportunities range form excellent to fair depending on dove migrations and agricultural practices on the surrounding farms. Dove hunters should scout the area during the later portions of the dove seasons when winter cold fronts push additional flights of doves into the area and hunting pressure is generally very light.
Bayou Pierre WMA is a well-known birdwatching area from early fall throughout winter and during the northward spring migration. The area is noted as an excellent area to see hawks and owls during the winter months. Also, white-throated, white-crowned, chipping, field, fox and song sparrows are regular winter residents. Red-tailed hawks, northern harriers and American kestrels are also common. Spring transient warblers include the yellow, Tennessee, black-throated green and magnolia. Common summer nesters on the area are scissor-tailed flycatchers. Numerous species of reptiles, amphibians and insects can also be found utilizing the diversified habitat.
Camping areas are not available on the area.
 
Additional information may be obtained from the LDWF, Wildlife Division, 1401 Talton St., Minden, LA 71055.

Bayou Macon

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
6,919 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 343-4044

Description:
Bayou Macon Wildlife Management Area is located in East Carroll Parish approximately 3.5 miles east of Oak Grove and 7.5 miles northwest of Lake Providence. Louisiana Highway 2 transects the northern portion of the area. Interior vehicle access is restricted to all-terrain vehicle trails.
Bayou Macon is 6,919 acres in size and was purchased by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries in 1991. Topography is flat with relatively poor drainage. Two intermittent streams, Brushy and Buck Bayous, are located on the area. Almost 1,150 acres of reclaimed agricultural fields have been reforested.
Overstory timber species present on this bottomland hardwood area include Nuttall oak, overcup oak, bitter pecan, hackberry, red maple, honey locust, rock elm, sweetgum, willow oak, and green ash. Common undestory vegetation includes deciduous holly, swamp dogwood, trumpet creeper, rattan, Japanese honeysuckle, swamp privet, pawpaw, dewberry, peppervine, hawthorn, greenbrier, and persimmon.
Hunting is available for deer, squirrel, rabbit, woodcock, dove, and waterfowl. A lottery hunt for wild turkey is held each year. Trapping is permitted for raccoon, opossum, beaver, and other native furbearers.
There is one primitive camping area on Bayou Macon WMA at the present time.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 368 CenturyTel Drive, Monroe, Louisiana 71203.

Barataria Preserve

Information
Owned: 
USACOE
Acreage: 
30,000 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(504) 589-2330

Additional Permit required. Contact Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve at 504/589-2330 for additional information.

Attakapas

Information
Owned: 
State of Louisiana, USACOE
Acreage: 
27,962 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 948-0255

Description:
Attakapas Wildlife Management Area, located in upper St. Mary Parish and in parts of lower St. Martin and Iberia Parishes, was acquired in 1976. The center of the area is situated about 20 miles NW of Morgan City and 10 miles NE of Franklin. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns a small tract of land that is also managed by La. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
Access to the 27,962 acre tract is by boat only, with major public launches available: (1) Millet Point, at St. Mary Parish Road 123, off of Hwy 87, (2) NNE of Charenton Of Hwy 326, (3) above Morgan City on Hwy 70, (4) off Hwy. 75 at Bayou Pigeon landing in Iberville Parish.
The terrain is characterized by flat swampland subject to periodic flooding and siltation from the Atchafalaya River. Areas adjacent to the River and spoil banks from dredging activities provide upland habitat and refuge areas during periods of high water. Many pockets in the management area have silted in and will continue to increase the land-to-water ratio.
The main overhead vegetation in the swamp is cypress and tupelo with some oak, maple and hackberry growing in the upland areas. Black willow is prevalent on the newly deposited lands, which are prevalent throughout the management area. Understory vegetation in upland tracts includes blackberry, deciduous holly, elderbery, and goldenrod. Greenbriars, peppervine, pokeweed, palmetto and switch cane. Common swamp plants are lizard tail, alligator weed, smartweed, coontail, pennywort and water hyacinth. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew caused wide scale destruction to the trees on Attakapas. The Department reforested many of the higher areas along the Atchafalaya River with cypress, ash, elm, water oak, nuttall oak, cherrybark oak, cow oak and other upland species. Also, roughly 30 miles of trails have been created and maintained around these reforested plots on the east and west sides of the Atchafalaya River.
Game animals most hunted on the management area are deer, rabbits and squirrels. Waterfowl hunting is also popular. Other animals present are beaver, nutria, otter, mink, muskrat, raccoon, bobcat, opossum, and alligator. Trapping is allowed for furbearing animals. Hawks, owls, shorebirds, and neo-tropical migrants are also present.
Crawfish, found throughout the spillway, provide commercial and recreational opportunities. Major fish caught in the area include catfish, mullet, bass, bluegill, gar, bowfin, and freshwater drum.
The self-clearing permit is required for hunters only. There are three primitive, remote camping areas on Attakapas. There is one camping area with picnic tables and running water located on St. Mary Parish Road 123 near Millet Point. Additional information may be obtained may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, Louisiana 70570.

Atchafalaya Delta

Information
Owned: 
State of Louisiana
Acreage: 
137,695 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
337-373-0032
Description:

The Atchafalaya Delta Wildlife Management Area is a 137,695-acre area located at the mouths of the Atchafalaya River and the Wax Lake Outlet in St. Mary Parish. The area is located some 25 miles south of the towns of Morgan City and Calumet and is accessible only by boat.

Most of the area consists of open water in Atchafalaya Bay. Within the Bay, two deltas (the Main Delta and the Wax Lake Delta) have formed from the accretion of sediments from the Atchafalaya River and from the deposition of dredged material by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Only about 27,000 acres are vegetated on these deltas. About 15,000 acres of marsh and scrubby habitat occur on the Main Delta, and about 12,000 acres of marsh occur on the Wax Lake Delta.

Hunting on the Delta is primarily for waterfowl, deer, and rabbit. Deer hunting on the Main Delta (deer hunting on the Wax Lake Delta is not permitted) is restricted to archery hunting by adults and youth lottery gun hunts. Harvest per unit effort on deer is extremely high. Fur trapping, commercial fishing, recreational fishing (especially for redfish, catfish, bass, and bluegill) and alligator harvests also yield great returns. Non-consumptive recreational pursuits include boating, camping, and bird-watching, especially on the Main Delta.

The area has two campground areas (with primitive restrooms) and has a number of pilings available for houseboat mooring.  Overnight mooring is allowed via permit only (16-day permits or hunting season permits).  Year-round mooring is prohibited.  LDWF offers both lease and lottery opportunities.  Contact LDWF New Iberia Office for more details at 337-373-0032.

Alexander State Forest

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
7,955 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Description:
Alexander Forest Wildlife Management Area is located in south central Rapides Parish about ten miles south of Alexandria, off U.S. Highway 167, and one mile east of Woodworth.
The Louisiana Department of Agriculture, Office of Forestry is the owner of this 7,955 acre tract which is managed as commercial forest with an emphasis on experimental forestry techniques. Indian Creek Lake, a 2,600 acre reservoir, is located on the area along with a 300 acre recreation and camping area.
The forest overstory is predominantly loblolly pine with scattered stands of longleaf and slash pines. Much of the timber is managed as pine plantations. However, creek drainages have been maintained in hardwoods. In addition red oak, blackgum, sweetgum, hackberry, beech, water and willow oaks are widely scattered over the forest.
Game species available for hunting include deer, squirrel, rabbit, quail and waterfowl. The featured species on the area is white-tailed deer. Herd density is good with antler quality and body weights typical of piney woods sites. Hunter success during the either-sex muzzleloader hunts is generally above average.
An education center is owned and operated by the Department on a 17 acre site within the WMA. The center is used for a variety of educational programs. Two shooting ranges are located on the grounds. The 100 yard rifle and pistol range and a shotgun range are used in education programs and also available to the public during specified times. Information on range hours and fees is available at (318) 484-2212.
Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries operates two fish hatcheries adjacent to the WMA. These hatcheries are the primary source of fish for the statewide stocking program. Booker Fowler hatchery has a visitor center and offers hatchery group tours by appointment. For hatchery information call (318) 748-6914.
Two boat ramps are located on Indian Creek Lake. Sportfishing is the major activity on the lake. Water-skiing and swimming are also popular recreational uses. Camping facilities are operated and maintained by the Office of Forestry. Trailer and tent accommodations are available with electricity, water, bath houses and swimming areas. A fee is charged for the use of these facilities. For camping information telephone the Indian Creek Recreation Area at (318) 487-5058.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1995 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, LA 71360.

Acadiana Conservation Corridor

Information
Owned: 
State of Louisiana
Acreage: 
2,285 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 948-0255

Description:
The Acadiana Conservation Corridor WMA is a tract of land situated in the parishes of St. Landry, Evangeline, Avoyelles, and Rapides, owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. This scenic easement area lying between the I-49 right-of-way westward to the Bayou Boeuf-Cocodrie Diversion Canal, begins just north of the community of Washington, La. in St. Landry Parish and extends northward through Evangeline Parish, Avoyelles Parish, and the southern portion of Rapides Parish. The entire length of this area is approximately 26 miles and comprises approximately 2285 acres. A small portion of private property is within the boundaries of the corridor, with the north boundary of this poperty starting at the railroad crossing near mile marker 48 on I-49 and the south boundary approximateely 1.3 miles from the railroad crossing. Access to this area is by boat only, with public boat launches available in the community of Wahington, La. on Bayou Courtableau and at Hwy. 29 on the west side of I-49. Self-clearing permits are available at these locations. The area is classified as bottomland hardwoods, with the main overstory species being bitter pecan, overcup oak sugarberry, swamp maple, water elm, and honey locust, with other species occasionally occurring. Understory vegetation is typical for such poorly drained lands, which has standing water for considerable periods after heavy rainfalls. Common species include deciduous holly, smilax, poison ivy, blackberry, dewberry, rattan, and peppervine, along with annual grasses and sedges. Palmettos are present throughout the understory. Hunting on the Acadiana Conservation Corridor WMA is limited to deer by bowhunting only. No other hunting is allowed on this easement area. No firearms are allowed on this area. Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries at 5652 Hwy. 182 Opelousas, La. 70570.

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