General

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LEEC Short Course Spotlight: Teach Wild: A Lesson on Marine Debris (New Orleans Region) Combination Workshop and Tour

LEEC's 2019 Regional Short Course event is fast approaching. With it, we're looking to bring environmental education professional development to communities all around the state. Classroom teachers and non-formal educators have a host of choices available at  http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/2019-leec-regional-short-courses for the February 16 event. Today, we're spotlighting  Teach Wild: A Lesson on Marine Debris.

Hosted by Monica Pasos of the Audubon Nature Institute, this day-long workshop at the Audubon Louisiana Nature Center, 11000 Lake Forest Blvd will highlight land-based marine debris education programs offered through Audubon Nature Institute's school field trips as well as resources teachers can use back in the classroom.

This workshop will educate regional educators and help them educate their students on plastic use in our society, the effects of marine debris along the Gulf Coast, and how to act both individually and as a community to prevent the creation of marine debris.

Activities will introduce the topic of marine debris and its impacts on ocean wildlife and local communities. An active learning experience will involve use of a micro-plastic filter apparatus and demonstrations to show the effects of micro-plastic ingestion by sea birds. Community based action can help empower our local communities.

Presenters: Monica Pasos, Audubon Nature Institute
Location: Audubon Louisiana Nature Center, 11000 Lake Forest Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70127
Grade Level: General (K-12)
Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Time subject to change)

2019 LEEC Regional Short Course Special Pre-teacher Payment

Short Course Registration

Click the "Buy Now" link below to register for the 2019 LEEC Regional Short Course event. Special Pre-teacher registration cost is $10.

 

Agents Cite Three Theriot Subjects for Illegal Oystering

Release Date: 01/09/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited three subjects for alleged oyster harvesting violations on Jan. 6 in Terrebonne Parish.

Agents cited Abelardo Carbajal, 55, Santa Carbajal, 50, and Spencer Calahan Jr., 25, all of Theriot, for taking oysters during a closed season on the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation and taking oyster during illegal hours.

LDWF agents were on patrol when they observed a vessel in the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation actively dredging for oysters around 11 p.m. on Jan. 6.

Agents stopped the vessel and found the three subjects in possession of 25 sacks of oysters.  Agents seized the oyster dredges and returned the oysters to the water.

The Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation is closed for the 2018/19 oyster season.

Taking oysters during a closed season brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.  Taking oysters during illegal hours carries a $400 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.

Agents Cite Carencro Man for Deer Hunting Violations

Release Date: 01/09/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited a Carencro man for alleged deer hunting violations on Dec. 21 in Lafayette Parish.

Agents cited Mark Benoit, 49, taking over the limit of deer, failing to comply with deer tagging requirements and intentional concealment of wildlife.

Agents received information that Benoit had possibly shot over his daily possession limit.  Agents then made contact with Benoit at his hunting lease on Schoeffler Road a few miles east of Carencro.

During the investigation, agents found that Benoit harvested one antlered and three antlerless deer that morning.  The daily limit for deer for this area on this day was one antlered and one antlerless deer putting Benoit two over the daily bag limit of antlerless deer.

Agents also found the antlered deer off a trail that Benoit attempted to conceal.  Agents seized the four deer.

Taking over the limit of deer brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail.  Failing to comply with deer tagging requirements brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Intentional concealment of wildlife brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days.

Benoit may also face civil restitution totaling up to $3,249 for replacement value for the illegally taken deer.

Al Sunseri, Bill Hogan Elected as Chair, Vice-Chair of Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission

Release Date: 01/08/2019

Al Sunseri, LWFC Chairman
Bill Hogan, LWFC Vice Chairman

Jan. 8, 2019 – Al Sunseri of New Orleans was elected chair of the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC) and Bill Hogan of Ruston vice-chair during the Commission’s January meeting Tuesday (Jan. 8) in Baton Rouge. The two Commissioners will serve in those positions through 2019.
 
Sunseri, who served as vice chair the previous year, is a lifelong Louisiana resident and is the owner and general manager of New Orleans’ P&J Oyster Co. He was a founding member of the Gulf Oyster Industry Council. In addition to serving on several boards, Sunseri has helped draft state laws and regulations relating to the oyster industry and coastal restoration. 
 
Hogan is a longtime Louisiana resident and president and CEO of Ruston Bank. He was born in Nashville, Tenn., grew up in Fort Smith, Ark., and graduated from Oklahoma State University with a degree in finance. A member of Ducks Unlimited for 29 years, Hogan has served as state chairman of DU and is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation.
 

Krotz Springs Men and Juvenile Cited For Illegal Night Hunting Violations

Release Date: 01/08/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement agents cited two Krotz Spring men and a juvenile on Jan. 1 for alleged deer hunting violations.

Agents cited Drake Martinez, 23, and Pervice Lalonde, 17, and a juvenile for taking deer during illegal hours, from a public road and from a moving vehicle.

On the night of Jan. 1, agents were on patrol in the Krotz Springs area when they found Martinez, Lalonde and the juvenile cleaning freshly harvested deer.

During the investigation, agents determined that Martinez, Lalonde and the juvenile harvested three does and a spike buck at night with a rifle from a public road near Indian Bayou in St. Landry Parish.

Agents seized the rifle and the four deer.

Hunting deer during illegal hours brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail. Hunting deer from a public road and taking deer from a moving vehicle each brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail for each offense.

The three subjects could also face up to $6,498 in civil restitution for the replacement value of the illegally taken deer.

LEEC Short Course Spotlight: Exploring the Relationship between Watersheds, Water Quality, and Human Activity (Lafayette Region) Combination Workshop and Tour

We're just weeks away from LEEC's Regional Short Course event. We aim to bring environmental education all around the state with a series of day-long and half-day workshops, tours and combo events on February 16, 2019. In the weeks leading up to the event, we'll be spotlighting each of the exciting opportunities available to you. You can view a complete lineup and register for a short course at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/2019-leec-regional-short-courses.
 
First up is: Exploring the Relationship between Watersheds, Water Quality, and Human Activity


Vermilionville Living History & Folk Life Park Entrance. Image courtesy vermilionville.org

Vermilionville Living History & Folk Life Park Entrance. Image courtesy vermilionville.org

 

This 7-hour CLU course is hosted by the Bayou Vermilion District and will be held at our Vermilionville Living History Museum in Lafayette, LA.  Course material will introduce teachers to our environmental science field trip package that offers a unique experiential learning opportunity, which takes a holistic approach to understanding the topic of water.  Our environmental education package is geared specifically towards facilitating a comprehensive understanding that connects the quality of water flowing through our local bayous to our daily habits, our cultural traditions, and our interactions with our natural resources, especially the Bayou Vermilion. In this course, participants will tour our Watershed Exhibit and Rain Garden, conduct a Macroinvertebrate sampling activity, conduct a Water Quality chemical test analysis, and take a Boat Tour on the Bayou Vermilion.
 

Vermilionville offers environmental education packages for groups of students.

Vermilionville offers environmental education packages for groups of students. Image courtesy vermilionville.org.

 

  • Watershed Exhibit tours:  Introduce students to the dynamic interconnections of planetary heat distribution due to the seasons, seasonal weather phenomenon, the water cycle, the life cycle of plants and animals, the physics of watersheds, the effects of water on humanity, and the effects of humanity on water.
  • Rain Garden Tours:  Introduce students to Best Management Practices used to improve water quality as they tour our BMP demonstration projects on property.
  • Macroinvertebrate Sampling:  During this activity, students will collect water samples from our pond, identify and classify the larvae of various aquatic macroinvertebrate organisms, and use their data as indicators of water quality.
  • Water Quality Sampling:  During this activity, students will collect water samples from the Bayou Vermilion and use our water quality test kits to test for temperature, pH, salinity, turbidity/water clarity, and dissolved oxygen.
  • Boat Tours of the Bayou Vermilion:  Expose students to a firsthand experience and interpretation of Bayou Vermilion topography and hydrology, the process of riparian and alluvial sedimentation, riparian habitats, and the important role that swamp systems serve to improve water quality.  
 
Presenter: Gregory Guidroz, Bayou Vermilion District
Location: Vermilionville Living History Museum, 300 Fisher Rd, Lafayette, LA 70508
Grade Level: 5th-8th, 9th-12th 
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Agents Cite Jonesboro Man for Over the Limit of Antlered Deer

Release Date: 01/08/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited a Jonesboro man for alleged deer hunting violations on Dec. 9, 2018 in Jackson Parish.

Agents cited Michael Potts, 58, for over the seasonal limit of antlered deer and violating the deer tagging regulations.

Agents on patrol observed Potts unloading a freshly killed seven point buck at his residence.  Agents also observed multiple deer heads hanging on a fence at his residence.

During questioning, Potts admitted to harvesting three eight-point bucks, two seven-point bucks and one nine-point buck this season.  For this deer hunting area, hunters are allowed to take three antlered deer per season putting Potts three over the seasonal limit.

Possessing over the seasonal limit of antlered deer brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Failing to comply with deer tagging requirements carries a $100 to $350 fine and up to 30 days in jail.

Potts may also face civil restitution totaling up to $4,873 for the replacement value of the illegal deer.

LEEC eNews: LEEC RELEASES 2019-2020 GRANTS PROGRAM REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The Louisiana Environmental Education Commission (LEEC) is now accepting proposals for their 2019-2020 Grants Program. The submission deadline for each of these grants is February 22, 2019. Applications will be accepted via electronic submission only.

 

Grants are available in four different categories. See descriptions and links to applications and guidelines below.

 

Educator Grants - Based on sound scientific principles, have an environmental focus, and be designed to directly impact Louisiana students - Those eligible: Accredited K-12 Louisiana schools - Maximum award: $1,000 for 1 teacher or $2,000 for a team —

Application: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/webform/2019-2020-leec-educator-grant-application

Guidelines: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/2019-2020-leec-educator-grant-guidelines-0 

 

Green Schools Grants - Supports projects designed to reduce a school’s environmental impact, reduce health disparities that can aggravate achievement gaps, and engage students in hands-on learning. Proposals to be considered are those that align with pillars found in the U.S. Department of Education’s Green Ribbon Schools Program: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/green-schools-pillars-and-elements - Those eligible: Accredited K-12 Louisiana schools - Maximum award: $5,000 —

Application: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/webform/2019-2020-leecldoe-green-schools-grant-application

Guidelines: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/2019-2020-leecldoe-green-schools-grant-guidelines

 

Professional Development Grants - Based on sound scientific principles, have an environmental focus, and be designed to directly impact preservice and/or in-service educators in Louisiana - Those eligible: Louisiana education, state, or environmental agencies, colleges, universities, or 501(C)(3) nonprofit organizations - Maximum award: $2,500 —

Application: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/webform/2019-2020-leec-professional-development-grant-application

Guidelines: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/2019-2020-leec-professional-development-grant-guidelines

 

University Research Grants - Post-graduate research with a focus on environmental issues - Those eligible: Students attending Louisiana colleges or universities and who are working toward a Masters, Ph.D., or conducting Ph.D. research are eligible to apply on behalf of their school - Maximum award: $1,200 —

Application: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/webform/2019-2020-leec-university-research-grant-application

Guidelines: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/2019-2020-leec-university-research-grant-guidelines

 

For questions regarding the online application, please contact Thomas Gresham at tgresham@wlf.la.gov.

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