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Three Louisiana Men Found In Possession of 146 Speckled Trout

Release Date: 01/13/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents assigned to the Statewide Strike Force charged three men for allegedly taking 146 speckled trout on Jan. 12, in Golden Meadow in two separate cases.

Strike Force agents cited Lebron Shelby, 46, and Linkton Arnold Jr., 72, both of Raceland, and Michael Musco, 38, of Golden Meadow for taking over the legal daily limit of speckled sea trout. Louisiana law allows 25 speckled trout per day per fisherman.

Agents setup surveillance and observed Shelby and Arnold Jr. catching several trout from their boat and then transferring the fish to their truck. The subjects would then continue fishing. After observing the subjects complete their fishing trip, the agents approached Shelby and Arnold Jr. to conduct a license and creel compliance check. The two men were found to have taken 109 speckled trout ranging from 12 to 17 inches in length.

In a separate case in the same area, agents observed Musco taking 35 speckled trout.

For taking over the daily limit of spotted trout, Shelby and Arnold Jr. faces fines between $400 and $950, or up to 120 days in jail, or both plus a $25 per fish restitution charge for every fish over the limit. Musco faces a fine between $100 and $300, or up to 60 days in jail, or both plus a $25 per fish restitution charge for every fish over the limit.

Agents involved in the cases were Sgt. Todd Laviolette, Sgt. Ezekiel Talbert, Senior agent Michael Williams and Agent Ronnie Engelhard.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Three Louisiana Men Plead Guilty In Federal Court

Release Date: 01/13/2011

Three Louisiana men pled guilty on Jan. 6 in U.S. Magistrate Court in Alexandria for violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Judge James D. Kirk accepted the guilty pleas from Larry H. Floyd, 54, and Randy N. Mathews, 56, both of Pineville, along with Kent D. Bryant, 69, of Deville. Each man pled guilty to one count of violating the Lacey Act for their involvement with the illegal sale and transport of ducks that were taken, possessed, transported and sold in violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Mathews was sentenced to pay a fine of $5,000, serve five years of unsupervised probation and had his hunting privileges suspended for five years. Bryant was sentenced to pay a fine of $3,000, placed on unsupervised probation for three years and had his hunting privileges suspended for three years. Floyd was sentenced to pay a fine of $1,000, placed on unsupervised probation for one year and had his hunting privileges were suspended for one year.

The guilty pleas stem from a covert investigation, which was initiated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 2007, of Mathews and his guide service. Further charges are pending as a result of the investigation.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents Lt. Eric Stokes and Sgt. Marcus Constance assisted USFWS special agents in the case. U.S. Assistant District Attorney Nicole Snyder prosecuted the case.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

L.D.W.F. Agents Cite Night Hunters In Catahoula Parish

Release Date: 01/12/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents cited a man, a women and a juvenile for allegedly night hunting using a bow and arrow in Catahoula Parish on Jan. 7.

Agents cited Brett N. Faulk, 18, and Samantha E. Byrd, 19, both of Forest Hill and a juvenile for hunting during illegal hours or with artificial light, hunting from a moving vehicle and hunting from a levee road.

LDWF Sgt. James Parish observed a vehicle moving along the Diversion Canal Levee Road while shining a Q-beam style light out the driver side window. After stopping the truck, agents also noticed somebody riding in the bed of the truck holding a bow with an arrow in the shooting position. The subjects stated they were attempting to shoot a deer.

The penalty for hunting deer during illegal hours is a fine between $900 and $950, or 120 days in jail, or both plus court cost. Hunting from a moving vehicle carries a fine between $250 and $500, or up to 90 days in jail, or both plus court cost. The court will determine the hunting from a levee road fine.

Agents involved in the case were Sgt. James Parish and Senior Agent Troy Mayo.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Coastal Land Stewardship Authority Announces Agenda for January 13th Meeting

Release Date: 01/12/2011

The inaugural Coastal Land Stewardship Authority meeting will be held on Thursday, January 13, 2011 at 9:00 A.M. in the Louisiana Room at the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries located at 2000 Quail Drive in Baton Rouge, LA.

The following items will be discussed:

  1. Roll Call
  2. Overview
  3. Introduction of Board Members
  4. Election of Officers
  5. Other Business
  6. Public Comment
  7. Adjournment

For more information please contact Bob Love at (225) 765-2811 or blove@wlf.la.gov

L.D.W.F. Agents Cite Two Concordia Men For Night Hunting From A Boat

Release Date: 01/11/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents issued citations to two Monterey men for alleged night hunting violations in Concordia Parish on Dec. 28.

Agents cited Jimmy Maier Jr., 43, and Charles W. Wiley, 71, for taking deer during illegal hours, taking deer illegally from a boat while a deer was swimming and hunting from a moving vessel in Cocodrie Bayou. Maier was also cited for taking deer with an illegal firearm and failing to comply with deer tagging regulations.

Agents were at the residence of Maier and Wiley investigating commercial fishing activity when they discovered a freshly killed spike deer head. Agents questioned Maier who confessed that he and Wiley killed the deer at night from a boat with a .22 cal rifle.

Taking deer during illegal hours carries a fine up to $950, or jail up to 120 days, or both plus court cost. Taking deer illegally from a boat or while deer are swimming carries a fine up to $350, or jail time up to 60 days, or both plus court cost. Hunting from a moving vehicle carries a fine up to $500, or jail time up to 90 days, or both plus court cost. Taking deer with an illegal weapon carries a fine up to $350, or jail time up to 60 days, or both plus court cost. Failing to comply with deer tagging regulations carries a fine up to $350, or jail time up to 60 days, or both plus court cost.

Agents participating in the case were Senior Agent Trey Mason and Senior Agent Robbie Mayo. Concordia Parish Deputies Lt. Chris Groh and Deputy Jamie Lipscomb also assisted in the case.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov. 

Simmesport Man cited for Night Hunting in Concordia Parish

Release Date: 01/11/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents issued citations to a Simmesport man for alleged night hunting violations in Concordia Parish on Jan. 1, 2011.

Brian Joseph Kimble, 27, was cited for allegedly hunting or taking deer during illegal hours, hunting from a moving vehicle, hunting or taking deer from a public road and discharging a firearm from a public road along Louisiana Hwy. 15.

Senior Agent Trey Mason received a phone call from an anonymous complainant stating that somebody had just shot a deer on La. Hwy. 15 near Deer Park. The complainant was following the subject in his personal vehicle traveling south bound on La, Hwy. 15. Senior Agent Mason was in the area and caught up with both the complainant and the violator and stopped the subject on La. Hwy. 15 in Pointe Coupee Parish approximately 1 1/2 miles south of Concordia Parish.

Kimble admitted to shooting at a deer on La. Hwy. 15 in Concordia Parish approximately six miles south of Deer Park.  The next morning, Jan. 2, an 8-point buck was found dead at the location of the incident the night before. Agents seized the deer and later donated it to a local charity.

Hunting or taking deer during illegal hours carries a fine up to $950, or jail time up to 120 days, or both plus court cost. Hunting from a moving vehicle carries a fine up to $500, or jail time up to 90 days, or both plus court cost. Hunting or taking deer from a public road carries a fine up to $350, or jail time up to 60 days, or both plus court cost. Discharging a firearm from a public road carries a fine up to $350, or jail time up to 60 days, or both plus court cost.

Agents participating in the case were Senior Agent Trey Mason, Sgt. Cliff Ortis and Senior Agent T.J. Ashley.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Two Subjects Cited For Deer Hunting Violations In Red River Parish

Release Date: 01/11/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited two men for alleged deer hunting violations on Jan. 1, 2011 in Red River Parish.

Agents cited Clifton Daniel Latour, 31, and Aaron Christopher Cannon, 26, both from Coushatta, for hunting deer during illegal hours with an artificial light, hunting deer from a public road and hunting from a moving vehicle. Agents also cited Latour for not possessing a driver's license.

Agents found the suspects driving on Springhill Church Road and using a spotlight to shine for deer from a moving vehicle. Agents stopped the vehicle and found a loaded Remington .243 rifle in the front seat.

Hunting deer during illegal hours with an artificial light brings a fine between $900 to $950, or jail time up to 120 days or both. Hunting deer from a public road carries a fine between $100 to $350, or jail time up to 60 days or both.  Hunting from a moving vehicle brings a fine between $250 to $500, or jail time up to 90 days or both. For driving without possession of a driver's license, Latour faces a $170 fine.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

SIX MEN FOUND IN POSSESSION OF 94 RED DRUM

Release Date: 01/10/2011

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents assigned to the Statewide Strike Force charged six men with possessing 94 red drum on Dec. 27, 2010 in Fourchon.

Strike Force agents cited Eric R. Wood, 23, of Ethel; John M. Calhoun III, 22, of Zachary; Anthony M. Guidry, 32, of Larose; Tad M. Gaspard, 40, of Lockport; John M. Calhoun Jr., 46, of Greenwell Springs; and Ted Joseph Gaspard, 50, of Lockport; for possessing more than 10 red drum each.

Agents received a complaint from a confidential informant in reference to several subjects angling from the bank near Flotation Canal located in Fourchon.

Agents arrived on scene to setup surveillance and observed the subjects catching several red drum and placing the fish in a boat that was in the bed of a truck. After observing the subjects for more than an hour, agents approached the subjects to conduct a license and creel compliance check.

The six men were found to be in possession of 94 red drum ranging from 16 inches to 25 inches in length. Louisiana law allows five red drum per day per fisherman and 10 fish for the possession limit per fisherman.

Wood was issued an additional citation for angling without a resident saltwater license. Calhoun III was issued additional citations for angling without resident basic and saltwater licenses.

The six men were also issued civil restitution citations for the value of the red drum.

If convicted of the over limit of red drum, the men face fines between $400 and $950, or jail time up to 120 days, or both plus court cost.

Agents involved in the case were Lt. Joseph Arnaud and Senior Agent Michael Williams, along with the assistance of Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office Water Patrol Sgt. Jeff Prevost and Deputy Kent Matherne.

Agents seized and donated the 94 red drum to the Larose/Cutoff Youth Center.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

State and Local Officials Highlight Remaining Oiled Louisiana Coast in Bay Jimmy

Release Date: 01/07/2011

LDWF Sec. Barham shows marsh grass still covered in oil.
Oiled marsh with open water in background
Close-up of oiled boom

Parts of Louisiana Coastline Still Heavily Oiled; Officials Asking BP, Federal Government to Finish the Job

Today, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Secretary Robert Barham and Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser toured a portion of Louisiana’s coastline still heavily oiled by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Bay Jimmy, one of the areas along the Gulf of Mexico coast still severely impacted by thick layers of weathered oil and matted marshland, was highlighted by Secretary Barham and Nungesser as a prime example of portions of the Louisiana coastline still in desperate need of a comprehensive clean-up and recovery plan.

State and local officials voiced concerns today over plans of federal officials and BP to turn the responsibilities for mitigating damage to wildlife across the oiled parts of Louisiana’s coast over to LDWF. The continued presence of pooled oil, oil saturated boom in areas such as Bay Jimmy and Pass a Loutre Wildlife Management Area (WMA) underscore the need for a comprehensive, long-term plan to rehabilitate the marsh.

“It has been eight months since the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion, and five months since the well was capped. While workers along the coast dedicated themselves to cleaning up our shores there is still so much to be done,” LDWF Secretary Barham said. “BP and federal officials are ready to close up shop and claim the job is done, leaving the state to clean up the mess. We will continue to push for a real resolution, more than just a wait-and-see approach for the miles of Louisiana coastline still oiled. They may have forgotten the impact on our wildlife and our habitat, but we have not.”

“We continue to find oil in different parts of Plaquemines Parish—Redfish Bay, Bay Jimmy, Pass a Loutre—depending on the tides, wind and thunder storms,” said Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser.  “We’re concerned about the long-term plan to keep assets in this region to help remove oil and protect the wildlife. This is by no means over and we're concerned that this is being wrapped up before it is.”

Shoreline treatment recommendations (STRs) for areas like Pass a Loutre WMA have been written by contractors for BP, and some have been executed, but rarely to the full extent necessary to restore crucial coastal habitats. For Bay Jimmy, treatment recommended in STRs has yet to begin; state officials are monitoring cleanup operations to ensure they are fulfilled before BP and federal officials pack up shop at the end of February.

Oiled boom, once used to prevent oil from hitting the shoreline also remains in numerous locations, forgotten or lost by contractors charged with their maintenance and removal.

Oiled birds also continue to be recovered by LDWF biologists, including three live Brown Pelicans in Bay Jimmy, and one dead Brown Pelican. Biologists also recovered one oiled, dead Brown Pelican in Pass a Loutre and one oiled, live Killdeer. These birds, which were recovered in the last few days, have increased concerns for continued wildlife contamination if marshes are not properly cleaned.

“We will continue to try to work with BP, their contractors and federal officials to come up with reasonable, effective solutions for treating and restoring our coastline,” said Secretary Barham. “But we won’t step back while officials pack their bags and leave Louisiana. We’re hopeful that we can reach an agreement for the next steps in our recovery plan.”
If BP and federal officials pass off the wildlife hazing efforts to LDWF, officials will be required to take over operations of hazing tools, such as propane cannons and other deterrents. Federal officials have asked LDWF to submit a Pollution Removal Funding Authorization (PRFA) to the Oil Spill Pollution Fund in order to acquire funds to take over the maintenance and operations of hazing cannons – requiring LDWF to justify why such hazing tools are necessary.

The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information, please contact Olivia Watkins at LDWF at (226) 610-8660 or owatkins@wlf.la.gov, or Kurt Fromherz of Plaquemines Parish Government at (504) 450-8779 or kfromherz@plaqueminesparish.com.

For additional photos, video footage and research documentation please visit: ftp://204.12.23.214/Jan_7_Marsh_Tour/.

Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Meeting

Date: 
Thu, 04/07/2011

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has scheduled the next regular public board meeting for 9:30 a.m. on April 7, 2011, at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries building located at 2000 Quail Drive in Baton Rouge.

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