Wildlife

Po-Boy Road in Pearl River Wildlife Management Area Closed Thursday for Maintenance Work

Release Date: 03/21/2019

March 21, 2019 – Po-Boy Road in Pearl River Wildlife Management Area (WMA) will be closed Thursday (March 21) until 4 a.m. Friday (March 22) for maintenance work. The road is closed from Old Highway 11 north to the Honey Island Shooting Range.
 
Pearl River WMA, which consists of 35,619 acres in St. Tammany Parish, lies between the East and West Pearl Rivers west of Slidell. For more information on the WMA, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2789
 
For more information contact Bradley Breland at 985-543-4777 or bbreland@wlf.la.gov
 

LDWF Reminds Public to Leave Suspected Injured, Orphaned Birds Undisturbed

Release Date: 03/21/2019

March 21, 2019 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) wants to remind the public to leave suspected injured and orphaned birds alone and undisturbed.
 
It is best to refrain from intervening in the normal fledgling process and become familiar with common behaviors of fledgling birds, young birds who have grown too large for the nest and need room to stretch/flap their wings and practice flight.
 
Each year LDWF receives calls from concerned citizens who have found what they believe to be abandoned birds. It is against the law to capture, transport or possess birds listed on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Treaty Act list and other wildlife. Generally, birds and other wildlife are better off left where they are found.
 
It is not uncommon to find young birds away from their nests during the spring and summer as they learn to fly. Young birds can be found hopping on the ground or in shrubs, fluttering their wings and may appear to be in distress. In reality, the young bird is continuing to be fed by its parents and is simply practicing for flight. If left undisturbed, adult birds will call and wait for a response from their young and provide the necessary care for the fledging during this process.
 
There are cases where intervention may be beneficial. Individuals who encounter displaced nestlings, birds which are mostly featherless, may immediately return the bird to its nest if at all possible and then leave the area.
 
Birds do not recognize human scent and will not abandon a nestling because of it.  If you are unable to locate the nearby nest, you can create and return the nestling to a false nest attached to the nearest tree or shrub where the bird was found. Instructions for false nests can be found on LDWF’s wildlife rehabilitation webpage at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife-rehabilitation-program Remember-IF YOU CARE, LEAVE IT THERE!
 
Individuals who believe they have encountered an injured bird, should leave it alone and  contact a biologist at their nearest LDWF Regional Office http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/regional-offices or an LDWF licensed wildlife rehabilitator.  A list of licensed wildlife rehabilitators can be found on the Departments website at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/rehab
 
Anyone interested in LDWF’s Wildlife Rehabilitation Program should contact Melissa Collins at 225-763-8584.
 

LDWF supports Calif. legislation that helps La.’s alligator industry

Release Date: 03/21/2019

March 21, 2019 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries supports California legislation that seeks to amend a law that would damage Louisiana businesses’ chances to earn millions of dollars in the sale of alligator-related products.

At issue is the end or sunset of a temporary exemption in law that allows the sale and importation of alligator parts, including skins and meat into the Golden State. The current exemption for alligator and crocodilian species has been renewed several times over the years, but is set to expire in 2020.

If the exemption expires and the ban on these products is imposed, Louisiana’s multimillion-dollar alligator industry will lose California’s lucrative high-end fashion market for the sale of skins used for shoes, boots, and handbags. It will also deprive the industry from using California ports as a method of international distribution, specifically to Asia.

A California Assembly member introduced a bill (AB527) in February to eliminate the impending prohibition, claiming that some patients would be denied new life-saving medicines derived from alligator and crocodile immune systems if the ban remains.

The bill by Republican Assembly member Randy Voepel would permanently legalize the importation of alligator products.

A number of groups opposing the ban have claimed it would hurt global habitat conservation efforts for alligators. They say incentive-driven conservation of the alligator around the world relies upon ensuring the economic viability of alligator products.

LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet said he fully supports the proposed legislation. https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200AB527.

Montoucet, a former alligator farmer, said: “Louisiana has done a great job of regenerating and managing our alligator population, habitat and industry. All three are sustainable. We wholeheartedly support the assembly member’s bill.”

The ban’s origin dates back to 1967 when there was concern that the American alligator was at risk of extinction. California responded with a law to protect the animal that included banning the importation or distribution of alligators in the state, but have subsequently delayed the ban with a series of temporary exemptions. Alligators are not native to California.

Since then, successful conservation efforts had resulted in the removal of the alligator from the endangered species list in 1987. Estimates are that Louisiana has the highest alligator population – nearly 2 million - in the country.

 

 

 

 

Archery in Louisiana Schools State Tournament to be Held in Shreveport on April 5-6

Release Date: 03/19/2019

Competitors in the 2018 ALAS State Tournament

March 19, 2019 – More than 1,200 student archers from 50 schools will compete in the 2019 Archery in Louisiana Schools (ALAS) State Tournament on April 5-6 at the Shreveport Convention Center. Students will be competing for $20,000 in scholarships and a chance to advance to the national tournament.
 
The event, which begins at 7 p.m. on April 5 and 8 a.m. on April 6, is open to the public. Admission fee is $5 for adults and free to those 17 years old and younger. The tournament runs throughout the day with the awards ceremony set for 7 p.m. This year’s state tournament will include both bullseye and 3-D competitions. Students qualified for the state tournament in two regional events held in January and February.
 
Volunteers to assist at this year’s event are still being recruited. To volunteer, please contact ALAS State Coordinator Chad Moore at cmoore@wlf.la.gov or 318-230-4352.
 
The ALAS program, administered by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF), is part of the National Archery in Schools Program (NASP), which teaches international target archery skills to students in grades 4-12. About 200 schools and 24,000 students in Louisiana participate in the program. Nationally, more than 14,000 schools and 2.4 million students take part in the NASP program.
 
The 2019 ALAS State Tournament is made possible by the generous contributions of our sponsors: NASP, Shreveport-Bossier Sports Commission, ENLINK Midstream, Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation, National Wild Turkey Federation-Louisiana Chapter, Hoot & Holler Archery, LSU AgCenter,  Morrell Targets, H&E Equipment Services, Bass Pro Shops, Quality Deer Management Association-South Branch, Homeland Security, Academy Sports, Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office, Y-Not Stop and Outlaw’s BBQ.
 
ALAS has grown rapidly since May of 2012 when about 35 schools participated. The program is offered in all parts of the state from rural to metropolitan areas.
 
The ALAS/NASP program is available to all schools in Louisiana and grants are available to assist with equipment purchases. For more information about the ALAS program, contact ALAS State Coordinator Chad Moore at cmoore@wlf.la.gov or 318-230-4352.
 

Sherburne WMA South Farm Closed for All Public Use Due to Flooding

Release Date: 03/12/2019

March 12, 2019 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has closed Sherburne Wildlife Management Area (WMA) South Farm for all public use due to flooding.
 
Increasing water levels in associated river systems has caused backwater flooding on the South Farm area. Once water recedes and necessary repairs have been made, the farm will be re-opened for public use.
 
Sherburne WMA South Farm is located in Iberville Parish, approximately one mile north of Ramah.
 
For more information, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2763 or contact Tony Vidrine, tvidrine@wlf.la.gov 337-735-8682 or Steven David, sdavid@wlf.la.gov at 337-735-8683.
 

LDWF Announces Road Closure on Pearl River Wildlife Management Area

Release Date: 03/07/2019

March 7, 2019 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has closed Old Highway 11 on the northern part of Pearl River Wildlife Management Area (WMA) due to flooding. Included in this closure is the Pearl River Honey Island Shooting Range, located within the WMA.
 
All hunting, except waterfowl, is closed when the river stage at Pearl River reaches 16.5 feet. The closure is an automatic benchmark set by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission.
 
Road closures are deemed necessary to ensure safety and prevent road damage. Once the water recedes, LDWF will inspect, repair and reopen those roads when it is determined they are safe for travel. 
 
The Pearl River WMA, which consists of 35,618 acres, is located approximately six miles east of Slidell and approximately one mile east of Pearl River.
 
For information on this WMA, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2789 or contact Bradley Breland at bbreeland@wlf.la.gov or 985-543-4777 or Jillian Day at jday@wlf.la.gov or 985-543-4777.
 

LDWF Announces Additional Road Closures on Richard K. Yancey Wildlife Management Area

Release Date: 03/06/2019

March 6, 2019 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has closed more roads due to flooding on Richard K. Yancey Wildlife Management Area (WMA), including Shell Road, Moreau Lake Road, East Fence Line ATV trail, Landry ATV trail, Alligator Bayou ATV Trail, Cabin ATV Trail, Sand Levee ATV/UTV Trail and Sand Levee Handicap Trail.
 
Other roads and trails could possibly be closed on the WMA as water continues to rise.
 
Roads on the WMA that remain closed include Hogpen Road, Ross Road, Catfish Bayou Road, Blount Road, Dobbs Bay Road, Union Point Road, Lincecum Road, Blackhawk Road, Blackhawk Boat Launch, East Cocodrie Boat Launch Road, Hunt Road, Wycoff Road, Sunk Lake Road and Silver Lake Road. The ATV trails that remain closed include Silver Lake ATV Trail, Pan Am ATV Trail, Bee Bayou ATV Trail, Ross ATV Trail, Jacks Bayou Trail, Blackhawk Trail, Dobbs Bay Trail, Catfish Bayou Trail, Twin Lakes Trail, Red Shirt Trail, Icebox Trail, Everett Lake Trail, Patton Lake Drain Trail, Chaney Lake Trail and the Catfish Bayou and Patton Lake Handicap Trails.
 
These closures are deemed necessary to ensure safety and prevent road damage. Once the water recedes, LDWF will inspect, repair and reopen those roads when it is determined they are safe for travel. 
 
Richard K. Yancey WMA is located approximately 35 miles south of Ferriday on Louisiana Highway 15 in lower Concordia Parish.
 
For information on this WMA, go to htt://www.wlf.la.gov/wma/36994 or contact Tony Vidrine at 337-735-8682 or tvidrine@wlf.la.gov or Steven David at 337-735-8683 or sdavid@wlf.la.gov .
 

LDWF Announces Road Closures on Dewey W. Wills Wildlife Management Area

Release Date: 03/01/2019

March 1, 2019 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has closed Hunt Road located south of the diversion canal, Muddy Bayou Road and Sandy Bayou Road to all vehicles on Dewey W. Wills Wildlife Management Area (WMA) due to flooding.
 
These closures are deemed necessary to ensure safety and prevent road damage. Once the water recedes, LDWF will inspect, repair and reopen those roads when it is determined they are safe for travel. 
  
Dewey W. Wills WMA is located in the southern portion of LaSalle and Catahoula parishes in central Louisiana approximately 20 miles northeast of Alexandria. For more information on the WMA, go to: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2753 .
 
For more information, contact Cliff Dailey at 318-487-5885 or adailey@wlf.la.gov .

 

LDWF Announces All Roads Closed in Grassy Lake Wildlife Management Area

Release Date: 02/27/2019

Feb. 27, 2019 – All roads in the Grassy Lake Wildlife Management Area (WMA) have been closed due to flooding, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced.
 
Once the water recedes, LDWF will inspect, repair and reopen WMA roads when determined they are safe for travel. 
 
Grassy Lake WMA is located in northeastern Avoyelles Parish, approximately 12 miles from Bordelonville.
 
For information on this WMA, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2767 or contact Tony Vidrine at 337-735-8692 or tvidrine@wlf.la.gov or Steven David at 337-735-8683 or sdavid@wlf.la.gov .
 

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