Wildlife

Roseau Cane Scale on the Delta

A small insect, or scale, known as the Roseau Cane Mealy Bug has decimated thousands of acres of Roseau cane in southern Plaquemines Parish and continues unabated.  The scale, native from China and Japan, has been identified as Nipponaclerda biwakoensis, commonly referred to as Phragmites Scale or Roseau Cane Mealy Bug. It has had severe effects on the dominant vegetation of the Mississippi River Delta. The rate at which it seems to be expanding and the severity of its impacts is alarming.

Roseau cane is a tall wetland grass that helps protect Louisiana’s bird foot delta.  More than 100,000 acres of Roseau cane dominated wetlands in the Mississippi River Bird Foot Delta has been affected by the scale as biologists continue to look for ways to stop its spread.  Unlike some marsh vegetation, Roseau cane stands up well to tropical storm events. It is one of the most erosion-resistant marsh plants on the bird foot delta. It also assists in building land by trapping sediment from the Mississippi River. The loss of it could lead to even more rapid land loss in the delta, turning what is now marsh into open water.

What also concerns biologists is that the scale could impact agriculture crops such as sugar cane and sorghum, according to Dr. Rodrigo Diaz, Assistant Professor in LSU’s Department of Entomology. He said it could have significant economic impacts to agriculture crops and native vegetation. 

Presentations by Leading Biologists from LSU and LDWF

               

Roseau Cane Scale Impacts on MS River Delta, D. Todd Baker – June 14, 2017 Biology and Ecology of the Roseau Cane Scale Rodrigo Diaz, LAWF Roseau Cane and Herbivory on the Delta Jim Cronin, LSU
Development of an integrated management program for control of the roseau cane scale, Rodrigo Diaz, JimCronin and Blake Wilson 

Photos of the Scale and its Damage

                    

               

 

     

Video and B-Roll

                       

         

Roseau Cane Mealy Bug Continues Destructive Path Through Southern Plaquemines Parish

Release Date: 06/14/2017

June 14, 2017 – A small insect, or scale, known as the Roseau Cane Mealy Bug has decimated thousands of acres of Roseau cane in southern Plaquemines Parish and continues unabated, biologists with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and LSU AgCenter said.

 

The scale, native from China and Japan, has been identified as Nipponaclerda biwakoensis, commonly referred to as Phragmites Scale or Roseau Cane Mealy Bug. It has had severe effects on the dominant vegetation of the Mississippi River Delta. The rate at which it seems to be expanding and the severity of its impacts is alarming, according to LDWF and LSU AgCenter biologists.

 

Roseau cane is a tall wetland grass that helps protect Louisiana’s bird foot delta. The severely impacted cane appears to be brown and mostly leafless, in contrast to the 10-foot tall robust leafy green cane normally seen this time of the year.

 

More than 100,000 acres of Roseau cane dominated wetlands in the Mississippi River Bird Foot Delta has been affected by the scale as biologists continue to look for ways to stop its spread.

 

“We could be witnessing a major habitat change on the Mississippi River Delta in the next year or so because of this,’’ said LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet. “It could be devastating. We don’t really have an answer yet or the solution. But it’s clear that everyone needs to understand this could be a catastrophic problem and we need to put this on the front burner.’’

 

Todd Baker, Director in LDWF’s Coastal and Nongame Resources staff, said the scale was discovered only last fall and has advanced quickly. It has been spotted in Grand Isle and in other parts of Jefferson Parish.

 

“Roseau cane is one of the most robust and hardiest plants that I’ve come across,’’ Baker said. “It can live in three feet of water. It can be inundated for long periods of time. It can live out of water. It can tolerate 20 parts per thousand salinity. It can tolerate fresh water. You can burn it, you can spray it and it keeps coming back. The fact that this bug can damage it to the point that it has is amazing and disturbing.’’

 

Unlike some marsh vegetation, Roseau cane stands up well to tropical storm events. It is one of the most erosion-resistant marsh plants on the bird foot delta. It also assists in building land by trapping sediment from the Mississippi River. The loss of it could lead to even more rapid land loss in the delta, turning what is now marsh into open water.

 

What also concerns biologists is that the scale could impact agriculture crops such as sugar cane and sorghum, according to Dr. Rodrigo Diaz, Assistant Professor in LSU’s Department of Entomology. He said it could have significant economic impacts to agriculture crops and native vegetation.

 

“Roseau cane is a grass,’’ Baker said. “What is known is that where this scale is native (Asia) it gets into other grasses and reeds. It may attack other plants in the United States. Now that it is present in Louisiana, we don’t know what it may impact. It’s a threat but we simply don’t know if it will move into other vegetative species or not.’’

 

For video, go to: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/94d3wntdlkopjbd/AABczKmeQX2c9S4tPF7XYd9Ca?dl=0

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us atwww.wlf.la.gov. To receive recreational or commercial fishing email and text alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

LDWF Assistant Secretary Jimmy Anthony Commended for 40 Years of Service by the Louisiana Senate

Release Date: 03/23/2016

 

March 23, 2016 – Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Assistant Secretary of Wildlife Jimmy Anthony was honored by the state senate Tuesday (March 22) for 40 years of service to the department and state by Louisiana Senate Resolution 24.

Louisiana State Senator Francis Thompson of Delhi acknowledged Anthony, who retired from the department this week, for his service to the LDWF in personal privilege comments on the senate floor Tuesday. Thompson highlighted the many accomplishments Anthony has made to the state and agency during his tenure at LDWF.

Senate Resolution 24 commends Anthony for his critical role in the development of the Wildlife Restoration Act Program, Wildlife Conservation & Restoration Program and the Mineral Exploration Program. He also was praised for his role in Louisiana’s wildlife restoration, reforestation, wetland restoration, timber management and deer herd evaluations as well as other programs and projects on which he worked. 

In addition to his daily duties with LDWF, Anthony is credited for his service on numerous special committees and boards, including the North American Bird Conservation Initiative, the Arctic Goose Joint Venture, the Fish and Wildlife Trust Funds Committee, Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society Reservoir Committee and the Atchafalaya Basin Program. 

Anthony’s expertise was recognized around the country and he was, on numerous occasions, asked to address members of the United States Congress concerning issues related to wildlife. He also served as an adjunct biology professor at Southeastern Louisiana University, teaching classes on cell chemistry, genetics, evolution, species diversity and ecology to undergraduate students.

“The Senate of the Legislature of Louisiana commends Jimmy Anthony upon his retirement after 40 years of service with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and extends a special thank you to him for his longtime service to the state of Louisiana and its citizens,’’ said Sen. Thompson.

“The tremendous impact of Jimmy’s lifelong commitment to ensuring the natural resources of our state are available for future generations may never be fully known,’’ LDWF Secretary Charlie Melancon said. “But the example he is leaving behind for the staff following in his footsteps will always be held in high regard within our agency.’’

Anthony will remain involved with wildlife-related programs during his retirement.

 

Deer Hunting Season to Reopen in Portion of Northeast and Central Louisiana on Saturday Morning 30 Minutes Before Sunrise

Release Date: 01/08/2016

Jan. 8, 2016 – Deer hunting season in areas of northeast and central Louisiana near the Mississippi River will resume Saturday (Jan. 9) 30 minutes before sunrise.

The closure, enacted Jan. 3 because of flooding of the Mississippi River, covered land from the Arkansas state line, east to U.S. 65 to Vidalia, La., and west of the Louisiana-Mississippi border. However, land from the levee to the Mississippi River in this area will remain closed until further notice.
Parishes affected by the closure include East Carroll, Madison, Tensas and Concordia.
 
The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us atwww.wlf.la.gov or www.FishLA.org. To receive recreational or commercial fishing email and text alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

2016 Turkey Season Lottery Hunt Applications Available

Release Date: 12/15/2015

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) is accepting applications for the 2016 turkey season lottery hunts on state wildlife management areas.  The deadline for application submission is Friday, Feb. 5, 2016.

Regular turkey lottery hunts will be held on 10 state wildlife management areas (WMAs) this spring.  Youth lottery hunts will be held on 14 WMAs.
The application forms for these WMA hunts for adult and youth hunters are now available on the LDWF website at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/lottery-hunts . The forms list all lottery hunt dates and locations.

The 2016 wild turkey season will open March 26 on private lands in three designated areas with varying end of season dates as follows: Area A, March 26 - April 24; Area B, March 26 - April 17; and Area C, March 26 - April 10. For a map with all areas color-coded, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/turkey.

The statewide youth and physically challenged hunter weekend for private lands will be March 19-20. To access additional information on turkey season, review the 2015-16 Louisiana Hunting Regulations booklet at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/regulations .

For more information, contact Cody Cedotal at ccedotal@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2361.

The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffbor follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

World Champions Honored at Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Meeting

Release Date: 10/02/2015

World Champions Honored at Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Meeting

On Thursday, Oct. 1 the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries recognized Louisiana student archers who participated in the 2015 National Archers in the School Program (NASP) World Archery Tournament in Nashville, Tenn. in July.

This year’s NASP World Tournament proved to be the largest ever held with nearly 5,000 student archers competing from five countries including the U.S., Canada, United Kingdom, South Africa, and Namibia.  Of those 5,000 students, 64 came from Louisiana and proudly represented not only their school but the entire state of Louisiana.

Benton Middle School, of Benton, La., were crowned as World Champions in the Middle School Division.   Benton Middle School also finished 3rd in the 2015 NASP National Tournament held in May in Kentucky.  Benton Elementary, who placed 4th at nationals this year and were last year’s World Champions, brought home their second World Championship becoming Louisiana’s first ever back-to-back World Champions.

Along with the world titles achieved by these teams, three individuals from Louisiana brought home World Championship titles as well.

Anna Robins of Benton Middle School finished 4th in the World in the middle school girls division.

Nathan Delill of Buckeye High School finished 3rd in the World in the middle school boys division.

Emma Bunch of Benton Elementary became Louisiana’s first-ever individual World Champion Archer placing 1st in the elementary school girls division.

In addition to being recognized at the LDWF commission meeting, these students received team and individual awards from the department recognizing their achievements.

The Archery in Louisiana Schools Program is a member of the National Archery in the Schools Program, which teaches international target archery to students in grades 4-12.  All students who attend school where the ALAS/NASP curriculum is taught become eligible to compete in State, National and World tournaments.   For more information regarding ALAS and how you can get a program started at your school contact the ALAS State Coordinator – Robert Stroede at rstroede@wlf.la.gov or (318)484-2276.

Temporary Road Closure on Pearl River Wildlife Management Area

Release Date: 07/29/2015

(July 29, 2015) – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is announcing a temporary road closure on Oil Well Road located on Pearl River Wildlife Management Area beginning today, Wednesday, July 29 for repair work. 
 
Vehicular traffic will resume once repairs are complete.
 
Pearl River WMA is located in southeastern St. Tammany Parish, approximately six miles east of Slidell and one mile east of Pearl River.  For more information about this WMA, visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2789.
 
The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources.  For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.
 
For more information regarding this closure, contact Christian Winslow at (985) 543-4777 cwinslow@wlf.la.gov.
 
 
For press inquiries, contact Ashley Wethey at awethey@wlf.la.gov or (504) 286-8733.

Friends of the Whooping Cranes Volume 3 Issue 1

 
Dear Friend of the Whooping Cranes-
 
Please find the latest edition of our newsletter linked below.
 
We appreciate your continued interest and support. Happy New Year 2014 to all of you.

 

Shooting Range Safety Zones Established on LDWF Wildlife Management Areas

Release Date: 11/22/2013

Nov. 22, 2013 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ Wildlife Division has established and enhanced safety zones surrounding shooting ranges on three Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs).

The affected WMAs include Bodcau, Pearl River and Sherburne WMAs. The Woodworth Shooting Range within Alexander State Forest WMA already had a designated safety zone established.

The Department wants to remind the public to consult with your local LDWF field office for hours of operation and rules on all WMA ranges and rules.  Information and maps for individual ranges as well as the associated safety zones may also be found at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/shooting-ranges.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Wildlife Management Area Program is charged with providing necessary habitats to manage and protect both game and non-game wildlife, as well as to provide quality outdoor recreation for the public.

For more information: visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov, at www.facebook.com/ldwffb; on Twitter @LDWF; or by contacting Steve Smith at ssmith@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2359; or Fred Kimmel at fkimmel@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2355.

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