whooping cranes

Chevron Recognized for Supporting Whooping Crane Re-introduction

Release Date: 08/08/2014

Chevron Recognized for Supporting Whooping Crane Re-introduction
Chevron Recognized for Supporting Whooping Crane Re-introduction

Aug. 8, 2014 -- The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) and Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation (LWFF) recognized Chevron on Aug. 7 for three years of financial support provided for the department’s whooping crane reintroduction project which began in 2011.
 
In a ceremony at Thursday’s Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission meeting in Baton Rouge, commission members, department staff and meeting attendees were briefed on the value of the $400,000 in Chevron grant funding and all that it has provided from 2012 through 2014.
 
“Chevron chose to make a social investment in southwest Louisiana and this project presented an ideal opportunity,” said Robert Love, LDWF Coastal and Nongame Resources Division administrator. “Re-establishing the whooping crane within Louisiana’s ecosystem involves not only specialized research tools but a lot of people power and teamwork. Success and sustainability also requires raising public awareness and appreciation of the birds’ presence and educating our young citizens, as well as our farmers, on the importance having of this iconic and charismatic species back on the landscape. The Chevron grant funding was vital in each of these project components.”
 
“Chevron Gulf of Mexico recognizes the importance of protecting biological diversity – the rich variety of life on Earth, its ecosystems and species, and the ecological processes that support them,” said Sakari Morrison, Chevron Gulf of Mexico General Manager of Public Affairs. “For this reason, we are a proud and active partner in support of the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation and the Department and their work to reintroduce whooping cranes to Louisiana and educate the public on the importance of wildlife protection.”
 
The grant funding has provided for satellite transmitter equipment and associated communications costs for tracking the movement of the whooping cranes released from LDWF’s White Lake Wetland Conservation Area in Vermilion Parish. Biologists plot the birds’ movement, habitat selections and adaptive behavior as they adjust to life in the wild.
 
Supporting LDWF’s efforts, the LWFF has coordinated receipt and dispersal of grant funds for stewardship, public outreach and educational purposes. Kell McInnis, LWFF executive director, presented a signed print of the Chris Davis’ wildlife portrait “Taking Flight” to Morrison in appreciation of the corporate support provided for the project.
Grant funds have additionally been utilized for a public outreach media campaign designed to alert the public that the birds are now on the Louisiana landscape, they should be observed from a distance if spotted and LDWF should be notified if anyone witnesses cranes being harmed.  Billboards have been produced, as well as television and radio announcements, to deliver these messages.
 
A third key component funded by the Chevron donation provides lesson plans and classroom tools that have been made available to Louisiana middle and high school teachers through educational workshops. Teachers then deliver endangered species information to students to foster an appreciation for non-game species and awareness of the significance of LDWF’s and its partners’ efforts.
 
The whooping crane, a very vulnerable species, was found in south Louisiana until their demise during the late 1800s and early 1900s when little conservation ethic was in existence and conversion of prairies and marsh lands to agriculture acreage became a trend. Since 2011, LDWF has soft released 50 isolation-reared, juvenile cranes provided by the US Geological Survey Research Center in Patuxent, Md., into rural southwest Louisiana, and 29 survive today.  Nesting pairs within that experimental population have produced the first eggs in the wild in over 70 years, but no fledglings have resulted as yet.
 
The recovery plan goal is for Louisiana to reach a subpopulation of 25-30 productive pairs, which translates to about 130 cranes in Louisiana. This process could take 15 to 20 years. To learn more about Louisiana’s whooping crane population, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife/information . To contribute to the whooping crane project or any LDWF initiative, go to the LWFF website at http://lawff.org .
 
For more information, contact Bo Boehringer at 225-765-5115 or bboehringer@wlf.la.gov .
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*photo 1 – (left to right) La. Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation Executive Director Kell McInnis, Chevron Gulf of Mexico General Manager of Public Affairs Sakari Morrison, LDWF Secretary Robert Barham and LDWF Coastal and Nongame Division Administrator Bob Love gather after Aug. 7 LWF Commission meeting recognition for Chevron’s contributions to Louisiana’s whooping crane re-introduction project.
 
*photo 2 – LDWF’s whooping crane recovery team gather with Chevron’s Sakari Morrison (front row center) following Aug. 7 LWF Commission meeting.  Team members (front row, left to right) Dr. Sammy King, USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at LSU Ag Center; Sara Zimorski, LDWF Project Biologist; Morrison; Venise Ortego, La. Environmental Education Commission Coordinator; Phillip Vasseur, LSU Ag Center Research Associate; (back row, left to right) Buddy Baker, LDWF Coastal and Nongame Division Biologist Director ; Kell McInnis, La. Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation Executive Director; Charles Smith, LSU Ag Center Research Associate; Bob Love, LDWF Coastal and Nongame Division Administrator; and Chad Gaspard, LDWF Technician.
 

Whooping Crane Eggs Produced in March Yield Vital Research Data, But No Hatchlings

Release Date: 05/02/2014

*LDWF PHOTO CAPTION – Infertile whooping crane eggs recovered this week from nest site in Louisiana.

 

May 2, 2014 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced today that the first eggs produced by Louisiana’s experimental whooping crane population will not result in hatchlings this year, a result most experts had anticipated.

The young pair of adult cranes, nesting in a crawfish pond on the northern end of the Cajun prairie, has been under observation by project biologists since eggs were spotted in their nest in March.  The 30-day incubation period has passed for what would have been the first whooping crane chicks hatched on the Louisiana landscape in over 75 years.  Whooping cranes are not expected to become successful nesters until they reach four to six years of age, and only a few of Louisiana’s whooping cranes will soon be four years old.  LDWF has collected the eggs and has determined they were not fertile.

“Although this nest did not produce chicks, it is still a very positive and progressive step for the reintroduction project for many reasons,” said Robert Love, LDWF Coastal and Non-game Resources Division administrator.  “This seems to be a strongly bonded pair, which produced two normal eggs, early in the spring and incubated them full term.”

LDWF biologists collected vital data on the cranes’ nest building schedule, nest attentiveness and their reactions to nearby farming activity. Throughout the process, biologists kept the farmer and landowner informed about the cranes’ activity.

The state’s whooping crane reintroduction project began with the release of an initial cohort of juvenile cranes in 2011 at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area in Vermilion Parish. There are three bonded pairs among the 30 surviving birds that are reaching maturity.

“From the beginning of this reintroduction, the department realized how vulnerable this species is to human harm, and knew one of the challenges would be to elevate the public’s respect for this wildlife species, through a stepwise process of awareness, appreciation and protection,” said Love. “That education and outreach challenge is being addressed through corporate sponsorship.”

The largest corporate supporter for the project is Chevron.

“Chevron believes that environmental stewardship is vital to sustainable economic progress and human development not only here in south Louisiana but throughout the world,” said Chevron Public Affairs General Manager Sakari Morrison. “The success of the whooping crane reintroduction program is encouraging for our area’s biodiversity goals but it’s also encouraging because it shows what can be accomplished through public-private partnerships. We look forward to continuing our support of the whooping cranes with LDWF.”

Team partners who assisted in bringing juvenile cranes to Louisiana annually since 2011 include the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, the International Crane Foundation, the Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife/whooping-cranes to learn more about whooping cranes in Louisiana.

For information on LDWF’s whooping crane reintroduction project, contact Bo Boehringer at 225-765-5115 orbboehringer@wlf.la.gov.

*LDWF PHOTO CAPTION – Infertile whooping crane eggs recovered this week from nest site in Louisiana.

LDWF Announces Historic Moment for State’s Wild Whooping Crane Population at North American Crane Workshop

Release Date: 04/15/2014

LDWF Announces Historic Moment for State’s Wild Whooping Crane Population at North American Crane Workshop
LDWF Announces Historic Moment for State’s Wild Whooping Crane Population at North American Crane Workshop
LDWF Announces Historic Moment for State’s Wild Whooping Crane Population at North American Crane Workshop

(April 15, 2014) – The foremost crane experts in North America heard encouraging news for Louisiana’s experimental whooping crane population when news of eggs produced by a mating pair was announced at the 13th North American Crane Workshop in Lafayette, La.
 
“I am proud today to announce to you that our small population of whooping cranes is adjusting well to life in the wild and a mating pair has produced eggs in the wild for the first time in over 70 years on the Louisiana landscape,” said Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Secretary Robert Barham. “Our biologist team and partners including the International Crane Foundation, the Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation and project funding donors have all made this moment possible.”
 
Barham and Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne welcomed the workshop group on Tuesday morning at Hotel Acadiana.
 
“Thanks to the completion of our state birding guide—published through my office in partnership with the American Birding Association and the Atchafalaya National Heritage Area -- Louisiana has become a strong competitor for birding-related tourism,” said Dardenne. “Similarly, conservation efforts such as the reintroduction of the whooping crane to Louisiana since 2011 are positive steps toward ecotourism in our state.”
 
The state whooping crane reintroduction project began with the release of an initial cohort of juvenile cranes in 2011 at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area in Vermilion Parish. The single nest with eggs, on the northern end of the Cajun prairie, remains under observation by project biologists.
 
Including subsequent cohorts, 50 whooping cranes have been released in Louisiana. Thirty of those birds have survived. Some have been lost to predators, some to naturally occurring health problems, and five in total have been confirmed as killed or wounded in shooting incidents.
 
The North American Crane Working Group, meeting this week in southwest Louisiana, is being briefed on Louisiana’s whooping crane reintroduction, the wild Aransas/Wood Buffalo whooping crane flock, the technology utilized in crane research and challenges to crane survival.
To learn more about LDWF’s whooping crane re-population project, visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife/whooping-cranes .

For information LDWF’s whooping crane reintroduction project, contact Bo Boehringer at 225-765-5115 or bboehringer@wlf.la.gov. For more information on the workshop, call Sammy King at 225-578-4179 or sking@agcenter.lsu.edu .
 
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Photo 1: Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne welcomes North American Crane Workshop attendees to Lafayette.
Photo 2: LDWF Secretary Robert Barham announces news of the first whooping crane eggs produced in the wild in Louisiana in 70 years.
Photo 3: Whooping crane nest with eggs on the northern end of Louisiana’s Cajun prairie.

 

Reward Increased to $20,000 for Information on Whooping Cranes Shot in Jefferson Davis Parish

Release Date: 03/10/2014

March 10, 2014 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced today that the reward has been increased to $20,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for shooting the two whooping cranes found in Jefferson Davis Parish on Feb. 7.

Anyone with information on this incident can contact LDWF’s Enforcement Division by calling 1-800-442-2511 or using the tip411 program.

To use the tip411 program, citizens can text LADWF and their tip to 847411 or download the "LADWF Tips" iPhone and Android app from the Apple App Store or Google Play free of charge.  CitizenObserver, the tip411 provider, uses technology that removes all identifying information before LDWF receives the text so that LDWF cannot identify the sender.

Organizations contributing to the reward fund include the Humane Society of the U.S., Dr. Ben Burton, the Louisiana Operation Game Thief Program, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation, Sara Simmonds, the Animal Welfare Institute, Operation Migration, Lake Charles Area Sportsmen, the International Crane Foundation, Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens, Audubon Nature Institute, Zoo New England, King White, Lowry Park Zoo, Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park, San Antonio Zoo, Joe Brooks and anonymous donors.

The whooping cranes were found near the corner of Compton Road and Radio Tower Road just north of Roanoke, about five miles north of Interstate 10. One bird was already dead when found and the second crane was transported to the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine in Baton Rouge, operated on and subsequently had to be euthanized when it failed to respond to recovery efforts.

LDWF has been working to restore a wild whooping crane population in Louisiana. Fifty juvenile cranes, brought to Louisiana in four separate cohort groups, have been released at LDWF’s White Lake property near Gueydan since 2011. Prior to this incident, 33 of those birds were alive and well on the landscape in central and southwest Louisiana.  Some have been lost to predators, some to naturally occurring health problems, and five in total have been confirmed as killed or wounded by firearms.

To learn more about LDWF’s whooping crane re-population project, visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife/whooping-cranes.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Reward Now $15,000 for Information on Whooping Cranes Shot in Jefferson Davis Parish

Release Date: 02/12/2014

Feb. 12, 2014 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced today that the reward has been increased to $15,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for shooting the two whooping cranes found in Jefferson Davis Parish on Feb. 7.

Anyone with information on this incident can contact LDWF’s Enforcement Division by calling 1-800-442-2511 or using the tip411 program.

To use the tip411 program, citizens can text LADWF and their tip to 847411 or download the "LADWF Tips" iPhone and Android app from the Apple App Store or Google Play free of charge.  CitizenObserver, the tip411 provider, uses technology that removes all identifying information before LDWF receives the text so that LDWF cannot identify the sender.

Organizations and individuals contributing to the reward fund include the Humane Society of the U.S., the Louisiana Operation Game Thief Program, Dr. Ben Burton, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation, the Animal Welfare Institute, Operation Migration, the International Crane Foundation, Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens, Audubon Nature Institute, Lowry Park Zoo, Zoo New England, King White and anonymous donors.

The whooping cranes were found near the corner of Compton Road and Radio Tower Road just north of Roanoke, about five miles north of Interstate 10. One bird was already dead when found and the second crane was transported to the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine in Baton Rouge and is currently recovering following surgery.

LDWF has been working to restore a wild whooping crane population in Louisiana. Fifty juvenile cranes, brought to Louisiana in four separate cohort groups, have been released at LDWF’s White Lake property near Gueydan since 2011. Prior to this incident, 33 of those birds were alive and well on the landscape in central and southwest Louisiana.  Some have been lost to predators, some to naturally occurring health problems, and five in total have been confirmed as killed or wounded by firearms.

To learn more about LDWF’s whooping crane re-population project, visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife/whooping-cranes .

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov .

LDWF Seeking Leads for Whooping Crane Shootings

Release Date: 02/07/2014

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents are looking for leads regarding two whooping cranes that were found shot in Jefferson Davis Parish this morning, Feb. 7.

The whooping cranes were found and recovered near the corner of Compton Road and Radio Tower Road just north of Roanoke about five miles north of Interstate 10.  Agents found a shot and killed female whooping crane and a shot and injured male whooping crane.

LDWF personnel were able to retrieve the injured male crane and will transport it to LSU for examination.  It appears at this time to have an injured wing suffered from the shot.  Agents believe that the birds were shot with bird shot sometime yesterday, Feb. 6.

“Anytime we lose one of these cranes it sets us back in our efforts to restore the whooping crane population back to its historic levels in Louisiana,” said LDWF Secretary Robert Barham.  “These were once native birds to Louisiana and the department would like to see these cranes thrive again in the future with a sustainable population.”

LDWF’s Operation Game Thief program is offering up to a $1,000 reward for any information about this illegal shooting that leads to an arrest.  To report any information regarding this whooping crane shooting, please call 1-800-442-2511.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

Fourth Cohort of Whooping Cranes Released at White Lake WCA

Release Date: 01/03/2014

Fourth Cohort of Whooping Cranes Released at White Lake WCA
Fourth Cohort of Whooping Cranes Released at White Lake WCA

Jan. 3, 2014 – Ten juvenile whooping cranes, delivered to White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area (WCA) in Gueydan last month, were released into the wild on Thursday. The young cranes join 23 adults which are part of an experimental population being monitored by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF).
 
The cranes arrived in southwest Louisiana on Dec. 11 from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Md.  LDWF is working cooperatively with US Fish and Wildlife Service, USGS, the Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation to establish a non-migratory population in the state.
 
The whooping crane is protected under the federal Endangered Species and Migratory Bird Treaty Acts and by state law. Anyone encountering a whooping crane is advised to observe the bird from a distance.
 
Whooping cranes are large-bodied, white birds similar to white ibis, white pelicans, and wood storks, all of which must be distinguished from legally-hunted snow geese.  However, a red head and black facial markings along with a height of five feet and a wingspan of 7 to 8 feet make them very distinctive.  In flight, whooping cranes display black wing tips and fully extended neck and legs, which extend well beyond the tail.
 
Juvenile whooping cranes are primarily white with some cinnamon-brown feathers remaining on their body, primarily on their head and neck. Their wing tips are black like an adult, but they lack the red head.
 
Anyone witnessing suspicious activity involving whooping cranes is advised to report that information to LDWF’s Enforcement Division by calling 1-800-442-2511 or using the tip411 program, which may offer a cash reward for information leading to arrests or convictions. To use the tip411 program, citizens can text LADWF and their tip to 847411 or download the "LADWF Tips" iPhone app from the Apple iTunes store free of charge.  CitizenObserver, the tip411 provider, uses technology that removes all identifying information before LDWF receives the text so that LDWF cannot identify the sender.
 
For more information on the re-introduction of whooping cranes to Louisiana, visit LDWF’s website at www.wlf.la.gov or contact Bo Boehringer at 225-765-5115 or bboehringer@wlf.la.gov .

 

LDWF Reminds Waterfowl Hunters to Be Alert for Whooping Cranes

Release Date: 11/01/2013

Nov. 1, 2013 -- As young waterfowl hunters prepare for the Nov. 2-3 Youth Waterfowl Weekend in the state’s coastal zone, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) is reminding all waterfowl hunters to be alert for whooping cranes in marshes and fields that contain legally hunted game birds.
 
LDWF’s whooping crane reintroduction program has released cranes into the wild from White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area each year since 2011. The birds have dispersed over time to locations that include east Texas, but there are whooping cranes situated in Acadia, Avoyelles, Calcasieu, Cameron, Jefferson Davis, Rapides and Vermilion parishes.
 
Anyone encountering whooping cranes in the wild is advised to observe them from a distance and minimize any disturbance. Hunters are cautioned to positively identify their targets as game birds before shooting.  Although whooping cranes in Louisiana are considered an “experimental, non-essential population” under the Endangered Species Act, they are still protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and cannot be pursued, harassed, captured or killed.
 
Waterfowl hunters should be accustomed to seeing large-bodied, white birds with black wing-tips, such as white ibis, white pelicans, and wood storks, which must be distinguished from the legally-hunted snow geese.  Whooping cranes are equally identifiable as they stand an impressive 5 feet tall and have a wingspan of 7-8 feet. Easily identifiable characteristics of whooping cranes in flight include fully extended neck and legs, and black wing tips. Photos of the cranes and similar species can be seen on the LDWF website at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/document/whooping-crane-identification-fact-sheet or in the 2013-14 Louisiana Hunting Regulations pamphlet between pages 30 and 31.
 
Hunters are encouraged to report whooping crane sightings to assist the department in tracking their movements. Location information can be reported to the White Lake WCA office at 337-536-9400, ext. 4 or szimorski@wlf.la.gov .
 
LDWF also asks experienced hunters to take the time in the field to educate young hunters and improve their target identification skills to distinguish game birds from non-game birds.  A whooping crane sighting can add to the outdoor experience for outdoorsmen and women of all ages and hunter vigilance can assist the department’s efforts to restore this unique species in southwestern Louisiana.
 
Anyone witnessing whooping cranes being pursued, harassed, captured or killed is urged to call the LDWF Enforcement Division’s Game Thief hotline at 1-800-442-2511 to report what they’ve seen.
 
For more information, contact Bo Boehringer at 225-765-5115 or bboehringer@wlf.la.gov .
 

LPB Presents: Alive! In America’s Delta -- The Whooping Crane’s Majestic Return

Release Date: 08/15/2013

 
Aug. 15, 2013 -- Louisiana Public Broadcasting unveils a special presentation of the first episode of its new six-part series Alive! In America’s Delta on Monday, Aug. 19 at 7 p.m. on LPB and Friday, Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. on WLAE in New Orleans.
 
“The Whooping Crane’s Majestic Return” features the biologist team leading the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ whooping crane reintroduction project.
 
This documentary follows the initiative to reintroduce whooping cranes into their ancestral territory in southwest Louisiana. By increasing the numbers of whooping cranes, the bird could eventually be removed from the list of critically endangered species.
 
For an exclusive view of these remarkable animals and the professionals who prepare them to thrive successfully in the wild, LPB producer Donna LaFleur and photographer Rex Q. Fortenberry followed alongside the LDWF staff members as they worked with the cranes. Fortenberry even donned the required crane costume to disguise himself and his camera to capture the arrival of the young birds to the White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area and throughout their release into the Louisiana marshlands south of Gueydan.
 
Future episodes in the Alive! In America’s Delta series explore Louisiana black bears, wildlife enforcement, and endangered species on land and in the water.
 
Additional broadcasts of the “The Whooping Crane’s Majestic Return” on LPB are scheduled for Wednesday, Aug.  21 at 10 p.m. and Wednesday, Sept. 4 at 8 p.m. and again on LPB 2 at 9 p.m. Live streaming access to the program will be available on www.lpb.org/live on Monday, Aug. 19 at 7 p.m. The program will then be available on-line through the end of August at www.lpb.org/alive.
 
For more information on the re-introduction of whooping cranes to Louisiana, please visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wildlife/whooping-cranes ; or contact Bo Boehringer at bboehringer@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-5115.
 
 
 
 

Reward Increases to $15,000 for Shooting Death of Whooping Crane

Release Date: 06/27/2013

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) officials are still looking for leads regarding a whooping crane that was found shot to death in Red River Parish in April.

The Humane Society of the United States and the The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust are offering $5,000, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation is offering $3,800, LDWF’s Operation Game Thief Program is offering $1,000, the USFWS is offering $1,000, the Whooping Crane Conservation Association is offering $1,000, John Perilloux is offering $1,000, anonymous donors are offering $1,250, the International Crane Foundation, through the restitution money from the South Dakota whooping crane shooting case, is offering $500, the Audubon Nature Institute is offering $250, and the Louisiana Ornithological Society is offering $200.

This brings the total in rewards to $15,000 for anybody that has any information that leads to an arrest and conviction.

LDWF Whooping Crane Biologist Sara Zimorski said, “We have a lot of people and organizations that are very serious about making sure the person that shot this crane is punished for his or her actions.  By increasing the reward amount, we are very hopeful that it will also increase the incentive for anybody with information regarding the shooting of this whooping crane to come forward.”

If any group or person wants to donate funds to increase the reward amount, please contact LDWF Biologist Sara Zimorski at szimorski@wlf.la.gov or 337-536-9400 ext. 4.

To report any information regarding this whooping crane shooting, please call 1-800-442-2511.

The whooping crane was found and recovered from the bank of the Red River about two miles northwest of Loggy Bayou on April 16.  After a necropsy of the crane, it was determined that the bird was shot with a 6.5mm/.264 caliber projectile.

Investigators believe the bird was shot between April 10 and 14.  The whooping crane was a part of LDWF's whooping crane reintroduction program and was fitted with a GPS tracking device.  The last tracking point of the crane moving was on April 10 near where she was eventually found dead on April 16.  The last tracking point received was on April 14 at the location she was found.

This whooping crane was released in Louisiana on March 14, 2011.

LDWF has released 40 whooping cranes since 2011 and currently have 25 whooping cranes they are tracking.  This is the third whooping crane that has been found shot with the previous two having been shot in Jefferson Davis Parish in October of 2011.

The reintroduced whooping cranes came from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, MD, and they were placed in the coastal marsh of Vermilion Parish within LDWF’s White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area (WCA).  This reintroduced population marked the first presence of whooping cranes in the wild in Louisiana since 1950.

LDWF is working cooperatively with the USFWS, USGS, and the Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit to bring the species back to the state.  This non-migratory flock of whooping cranes is designated as a non-essential, experimental population but is still protected under state law, the Endangered Species Act, and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

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