LDWF News

LDWF News Release

LDWF Continues to Monitor for Chronic Wasting Disease in State’s White-tailed Deer Population

Release Date: 04/07/2016

April 7, 2016 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries continues to monitor for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in white-tailed deer native to the state and has stepped up preventative efforts as CWD has entered Texas and Arkansas.
 
LDWF veterinarian Jim LaCour and agency Deer Management Assistance Program coordinator Jimmy Ernst said the disease, for which there is no cure, has not been found in Louisiana. However, it is important to be prepared in the event it does.
 
LaCour gave an update to the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission during its April meeting in Baton Rouge on Thursday (April 7).
 
“We’ve been monitoring for CWD statewide for more than 10 years,” LaCour said, “and have checked 7,000-plus deer and have not discovered it. We are being proactive because it’s in our neighboring states (Texas and Arkansas) and it’s close enough that we need to be on guard.’’
 
CWD is a neurodegenerative disease found in most deer species, including moose, elk and mule deer as well as white-tailed deer. It is infectious and always fatal. It’s part of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and is similar to BSE (mad cow disease) of cattle and scrapie in sheep. These diseases cause irreversible damage to brain tissue which leads to salivation, neurological symptoms, emaciation and death of the animal.
 
CWD is caused by prions, which are proteins normally found in the body that have mutated. These prions kill nerve cells and cause holes to develop in the brain tissue. They are spread through direct deer-to-deer contact or through contact with urine, feces, saliva and body parts of infected deer or infectious materials in the soil. It’s most commonly found in deer pens and captive facilities.
 
It is different from hemorrhagic disease (epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus and/ or bluetongue virus), which is a virus spread by bites from infected insects.
 
Deer infected with CWD can spread the disease even before symptoms develop. It can take one to two years for infected animals to become symptomatic. When symptoms appear they can include emaciation, lethargy, abnormal behavior and loss of bodily functions. Other signs include excessive salivation, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, teeth grinding and drooping ears.
 
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) there is no evidence that CWD can infect humans. However, the CDCP recommends caution in handling venison in the infected region and that deer be tested for CWD before consuming.
 
The prions remain for years in the environment and there has not been a method discovered to eradicate them.  “Once the infected deer die, after they decompose, those particles go into the soil and they stay there indefinitely,’’ LaCour said.
 
CWD has been documented in 23 states and two Canadian provinces.
 
Though Louisiana has yet to see a single case of CWD, Ernst and LaCour said the LDWF has developed a plan should the disease be found here.
 
Once it is discovered, there will be feeding and baiting restrictions in the geographic area where the disease is found around the initial case. It may also be necessary to reduce and maintain a lower deer density in that area.
 
There also will be movement restrictions placed on deer body parts, and the creation of a CWD management zone, the size of which will depend on the location and distribution of infected deer.
 
 “Hunters won’t be able to bring a whole deer out  from property within that radius,’’ Ernst said. “They’ll be able to bring out the deboned meat, a clean skull plate with the antlers, and the cape, which is the skin of the head and shoulders.
 
“The goal is to take an area around the initial case and maintain intensive surveillance. We will liberalize the season locally and we will test those harvested animals as they come out. By stopping baiting and feeding, which congregates animals, and by reducing the population, there isn’t as much deer-to-deer interaction. That will slow the spread of the disease. We will continue surveillance and control in that area for an indefinite period of time. Hopefully, working with hunters and landowners, we can minimize the spread of the disease with these measures.’’
 
Ernst said the LDWF will remain vigilant in testing and enacting preventative measures against CWD introduction into Louisiana.  Working with Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry (LDAF) to prevent importation of potential CWD infected animals into the state through the LDAF licensed deer pen program is a continuing effort of LDWF.
 
For more information about chronic wasting disease, see the LDWF’s CWD FAQ page.
 
The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov or www.FishLA.org. To receive recreational or commercial fishing email and text alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

 

Tags:

LDWF Will Host Explore Bowhunting Workshop April 30 at Haughton Middle School

Release Date: 04/07/2016

April 7, 2016 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries will hold an Explore Bowhunting instructor’s workshop April 30 at 9 a.m. at Haughton Middle School in Haughton, La.
 
The workshop is free and will provide six hours of hands-on training for teachers. All material used during the workshop will be furnished.
 
Explore Bowhunting is an outdoor conservation education program, focusing on interaction with wildlife. It teaches students how to enjoy the outdoors by developing basic skills in bow hunting as well as gaining an appreciation for and better understanding of wildlife.
 
To register for the workshop, schedule a workshop at your school or for more information, contact John Sturgis at 337-948-0255 or jsturgis@wlf.la.gov.

Tags:

Big Bass Rodeo Continues to Grow in Its 69th Year

Release Date: 04/06/2016

Darryl Delerno, Jr., Joel Courcelle Award
Brennan LeJeune, Paul Kalman Award
Mandeville High School Bass Busters

Despite a brisk and windy morning, over 680 New Orleans area anglers gathered in City Park to compete in the 69th annual Big Bass Rodeo hosted by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and New Orleans City Park.
 
Darryl Delerno, Jr., of Gretna, landed a 4.13-pound bass, earning him the Joel Courcelle Award for top bass of the day.  Dalerno was also awarded the right to compete in the upcoming Champion’s Challenge against previous winners.
 
Even the youngest of anglers braved the weather to try their hand at landing an award-winning catch. Brennan LeJeune reeled in a 1.1-pound largemouth bass and took home the Paul Kalman Award for largest catch for anglers 12 years old or younger. Nathan McCann came in first place with his .64-pound weight in the bream, cichlid or perch category.
 
A new competition category brought high school rivalry to a whole new level.  Battle for the Bass pitted high schools fishing teams of up to five members against one another to land the two largest bass per team. The Bass Busters of Mandeville High School took home the inaugural honor with an overall combined weight of 5.25 pounds.  The team of Bailey Madere, Trenton Pittman, Garrett Williams, Cole Plaisance and Clay Thrasher beat out 30 other area teams for the top prize and bragging rights.
 
For more information on the Big Bass Rodeo or Battle for the Bass, contact outreach@wlf.la.gov or visit www.fishla.org.
 
A complete list of winners is as follows:
 
Bass Category-Adult
1.     Darryl Delerno, Jr. – 4.13 lbs.
2.     DJ Parr – 3.88 lbs.
3.     Mike Laviolette – 3.22 lbs.
 
Champion’s Challenge
1.     Cary Smith – 2.76 lbs.
 
Cichlid and Bream Team
1.     Team Camo – 3.97 lbs.
2.     Stop, Drop and Reel – 3.18 lbs.
3.     Get the Net – 2.5 lbs.
 
Catch-A-Cat
1.     Zach Henderson – 16.38 lbs.
 
Catch-A-Gar
1.     Peter Durr – 1.77 lbs.
 
Bass Category-Junior
1.     Brennan LeJeune – 1.1 lbs.
2.     Hunter Thomassie – 0.89 lbs.
3.     Jacob Breaux – 0.64 lbs.
 
Bream, Cichlid or Perch-Junior
1.     Nathan McCann – 0.64 lbs.
2.     Caleb Buras – 0.48 lbs.
3.     Brooklyn Schneider - .30 lbs.
 
Battle for the Bass
1.     Bass Busters from Mandeville High School – Total weight: 5.25 lbs.
2.     Griffins from Dutchtown High School – Total weight: 2.32 lbs.
3.     Fishing of Any Kind from Archbishop Rummel High School – Total Weight 2.24 lbs.
 
Bass Category-Boats on the Bayou
1.     Kevin Metz – 3.04 lbs.
2.     Chase Crawford – 2.17 lbs.
3.     Luke Beslin – 0.86 lbs.
 
Trout Category-Boats on the Bayou
1.     Chris Holmes – 1.84 lbs.
2.     Sam McCarroll – 0.77 lbs.
 
Trashbash Category-Boats on the Bayou
1.     Geoffrey Vdoff - 0.72 lbs.
2.     Geoffrey Vdoff - 0.34 lbs.
3.     Geoffrey Vdoff – 0.33 lbs.

Wildlife and Fisheries April 2016 Commission Meeting Agenda

Release Date: 04/05/2016

The next regular Commission Meeting of the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission will be held at 9:30 AM on Thursday, April 7, 2016, at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Headquarters Building located at 2000 Quail Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 The following items will be discussed:

1. Call to Order

2. Roll Call

3. Commission Special Announcements / Personal Privilege

4. To hear Enforcement Reports March 2016

5. To hear an update on the 2016 Legislative Session

6. To hear an update on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

7. To Consider Resolution To Continue Support of the Gulf States Red Snapper Management Authority (GSRSMA) and Transfer of Authority to GSRSMA over Fisheries Management and Data Collection for the Red Snapper in State and Federal Waters off the Coast of Louisiana

8. To hear final summary of public comments for the Notice of Intent 2016-2018 Resident Game Hunting Season, 2016-2017 General and WMA Hunting Seasons And Rules and Regulations, 2016-2017 General and WMA Turkey Hunting Regulations, 2016-2017 Turkey Hunting Areas, Seasons and Bag Limits and 2016-2017 Migratory Bird Seasons, Regulations and Bag Limits

9. To consider final approval of the 2016-2018 Resident Game Hunting Season, 2016-2017 General and WMA Hunting Seasons and Rules and Regulations, 2016-2017 General and WMA Turkey Hunting Regulations, 2016-2017 Turkey Hunting Areas, Seasons, and Bag Limits, and 2016-2017 Migratory Bird Seasons, Regulations, and Bag Limits: Consideration of Conditionally Adopted Amendments to Notice of Intent and Consideration of Amended Notice of Intent

10. Set August 2016 Meeting Date

11. Receive Public Comments

12. Adjournment

 

Please register for April 2016 LWF Commission Meeting on Apr 7, 2016 9:30 AM CDT at: 
 
 
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
 
Brought to you by GoToWebinar®
Webinars Made Easy®
Tags:

Gov. John Bel Edwards appoints William D. “Bill” Hogan to Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission

Release Date: 04/05/2016

William D. "Bill" Hogan

April 5, 2016 - William D. “Bill” Hogan, President and CEO of Ruston Bank, has been appointed to the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission by Gov. John Bel Edwards. Hogan, who will serve as an at-large member of the commission, replaces Ronny Graham of Ruston.
 
Hogan will attend his first commission meeting as a member of the board Thursday during the LWFC April meeting in Baton Rouge.
 
Hogan, who lives in Ruston, has resided in Louisiana since 1989. He and his wife Kelly have two daughters, Taylor and Natalie. He was born in Nashville, Tenn., grew up in Fort Smith, Ark., and graduated from Oklahoma State University with a degree in finance.
 
“As an avid outdoorsman and a long-time Louisiana resident, I am honored to serve and support the state in its efforts to conserve, protect and wisely use our abundant hunting and fishing habitat, species and opportunities with which we are uniquely blessed,’’ Hogan said.
 
A member of Ducks Unlimited for 25 years, Hogan has served as state chairman of DU and is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation. He also has been active in several civic groups in the Ruston area. He is vice president of the Louisiana Tech University Foundation and served as chairman of the Ruston-Lincoln Convention and Visitors Bureau. He was campaign chairman and a board member of the United Way.
 
“I believe we all have obligations to act as stewards of our natural resources and ensure that our rich outdoor traditions and culture are managed and maintained for current and future generations to enjoy,’’ Hogan said. “I am truly honored to be appointed as a commissioner by Governor John Bel Edwards and pledge to work for the people of Louisiana to help keep our state as the true Sportsman’s Paradise.’’

Tags:

LDWF Opens Boyce Tower Road at Maurepas Swamp WMA, Two Side Roads at Pearl River WMA

Release Date: 04/04/2016

April 4, 2016 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has reopened Boyce Tower Road at Maurepas Swamp Wildlife Management Area (WMA). It has also opened Poboy Road and Indian Bayou Road on the Pearl River WMA.
 
Only Oil Well Road at Pearl River WMA remains closed. It is expected to open later this week as flood waters subside. LDWF will open that road when it has been inspected and deemed safe for travel.
 
Flooding in March at both WMAs forced closure of those roads.
 
The Pearl River WMA, which consists of 35,618 acres, is located approximately six miles east of Slidell and approximately one mile east of Pearl River in St. Tammany Parish. For more information on this WMA, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2789.
 
Maurepas Swamp WMA, which consists of 122,098 acres, is located approximately 25 miles west of New Orleans and along the south shore of Lake Maurepas west to near Sorrento. The WMA includes property in Ascension, Livingston, St. John the Baptist, St. James and Tangipahoa parishes. For more information on the WMA, go to: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2791.
 
For more information on both WMAs, contact Forest Burks at fburks@wlf.la.gov or 985-543-4781.

Tags:

Pearl River Wildlife Management Area Reopened But Three Side Roads Remain Closed

Release Date: 04/01/2016

April 1, 2016 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has reopened the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area (WMA) but three side roads, including Poboy Road, Oil Well Road and Indian Bayou Road, remain closed.
 
The Pearl River WMA was closed March 13 when the flood gauge at the Pearl River reached 16.5 feet, initiating an automatic benchmark closure set by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission.
 
Though the gauge has dipped below 16.5 feet, the three side roads remain closed due to high water. LDWF will continue to monitor the water levels and open the roads when they have been inspected and deemed safe for travel.
 
The Pearl River WMA, which consists of 35,618 acres, is located approximately six miles east of Slidell and approximately one mile east of Pearl River.

For more information on this WMA, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2789 or contact Forest Burks at fburks@wlf.la.gov or 985-543-4781.

Tags:

LA Crab Task Force to Meet Tuesday, April 5th

Release Date: 04/01/2016

 

News Release

 

For Immediate Release
April 1, 2016

 

Contact: Rene LeBreton

Public Information
LDWF

(504) 286-8745

rlebreton@wlf.la.gov

Share Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus

Louisiana Crab Task Force to Meet

                                                                             

 

Pete Gerica, Chairman

Tuesday, April 5, at 1:00 p.m.

UNO Advanced Technology Center

2021 Lakeshore Dr., Room 210

New Orleans, Louisiana 70122

 

AGENDA

I.            Roll Call and Introduction of Guests

II.           Approval of January 12 meeting minutes and April 5, 2016 agenda

III.          Financial Report

IV.          Old Business

A.    Further Discussion of Management Options- Pete Gerica

V.           New Business

A.     2016 Derelict Crab Trap Cleanup Summary - LDWF

B.     Changes to the LFF Professionalism Program - LDWF

C.     Discussion and Definition of Navigable Waters - Pete Gerica

D.     Discussion of black drum regulations and issues that will protect smaller crab population - Emery Lebouef

VI.             Public Comment

VII.            Set Next Meeting

VIII.           Adjourn

 

The meeting will be held in compliance with Louisiana’s Open Meetings Law as defined by Louisiana R.S. 42:11, et seq.  The public is invited to attend.  To listen in to the meeting via webinar register at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5038509109365190148

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov or www.FishLA.org. To receive recreational or commercial fishing email and text alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

 

Partial Reopening of Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation

Release Date: 03/31/2016

Partial Reopening of Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries will reopen a portion of the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation at one half-hour before sunrise on Monday, April 4, 2016, for the purpose of market oyster harvest only.  This area will close at one half-hour after sunset on Thursday, April 14, 2016.
 
The portion of the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation to be reopened is the area west of a line of longitude at 90 degrees 55 minutes 25.907 seconds W.  The daily and possession sack limit is set at 25, and the following conditions also apply:

  • All oysters aboard a vessel harvesting on the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation are deemed to have been taken from the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation.
  • Prior to leaving the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation, all oysters must be sacked, the number of sacks harvested recorded in a logbook and each sack properly tagged.
  • All vessels located in the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation during those times between one half-hour after sunset and one half-hour before sunrise should have all oyster dredges unshackled.

Public notice of any opening, delay or closure of a season will be provided at least 72 hours prior to such action, unless such closure is ordered by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals for public health concerns.

PARTIAL RE-OPENING OF SEED GROUNDS IN MISSISSIPPI SOUND AND LAKE BORGNE FOR OYSTER TRANSPLANT

Release Date: 03/29/2016

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has announced that a portion of the Public Oyster Seed Grounds in Mississippi Sound and Lake Borgne shall re-open at one half hour before sunrise on Friday, April 1, 2016 and shall close at one-half hour after sunset on Thursday, April 14, 2016.  This re-opening is for the purpose of conducting a permitted transplant, or relay, of live oysters for bedding purposes only from waters within the Public Oyster Seed Grounds further described in the map here which are currently classified as “closed” by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (LDHH).  All individuals found harvesting in this area must possess a valid LDHH Oyster Transplant Permit.

The Secretary of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is authorized to take emergency action to re-open Public Oyster Seed Grounds and Reservations if sufficient quantities of oysters are available, to adjust sack limits and sacking-only areas, and to take emergency action as necessary to close this area if it is found that excessive amounts of non-living reef material is present in transplant loads.

Public notice of any opening, delay, or closure of a season will be provided at least 72 hours prior to such action, unless such closure is ordered by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals for public health concerns.

Syndicate content