Bienville


Streptanthus hyacinthoides

Streptanthus hyacinthoides
Streptanthus hyacinthoides
Streptanthus hyacinthoides
Class: 
Dicotyledons
Family: 
Brassicaceae
Scientific Name: 

Streptanthus hyacinthoides

Common Name: 
Smooth Twistflower
GRANK: 
G4
SRANK: 
S2

Amsonia ludoviciana

Amsonia ludoviciana
Amsonia ludoviciana
Amsonia ludoviciana
Class: 
Dicotyledons
Family: 
Apocynaceae
Scientific Name: 

Amsonia ludoviciana

Common Name: 
Louisiana Blue Star
GRANK: 
G3
SRANK: 
S3

Taenidia integerrima

Taenidia integerrima
Taenidia integerrima
Taenidia integerrima
Class: 
Dicotyledons
Family: 
Apiaceae
Scientific Name: 

Taenidia integerrima

Common Name: 
Yellow Pimpernell
GRANK: 
G5
SRANK: 
S2

Selaginella arenicola ssp. riddellii

Selaginella arenicola ssp. riddellii
Selaginella arenicola ssp. riddellii
Class: 
Ferns and Fern Allies
Family: 
Selaginellaceae
Scientific Name: 

Selaginella arenicola ssp. riddellii

Common Name: 
Riddell's Spike Moss
GRANK: 
G4T4
SRANK: 
S3

Dryopteris ludoviciana

Dryopteris ludoviciana
Dryopteris ludoviciana
Class: 
Ferns and Fern Allies
Family: 
Dryopteridaceae
Scientific Name: 

Dryopteris ludoviciana

Common Name: 
Southern Shield Wood-fern
GRANK: 
G4
SRANK: 
S2

Loggy Bayou WMA

Information
Owned: 
LDWF, USACOE
Acreage: 
6,381 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Loggy Bayou Wildlife Management Area is located in the southern most part of Bossier Parish and consists of 6,381 acres. It is owned Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Louisiana State Land Office. The area lies approximately 20 miles southeast of Bossier City. Main access into the northern portion of the area if off of Louisiana Highway 154 just east of Lake Bistineau and into the southern portion from U. S. Highway 71. The Department maintains one all-weather road and a series of ATV trails through interior of the area.
Loggy Bayou WMA lies between Loggy and Red Chute Bayous and Lake Bistineau in the Red River Alluvial Valley of northwestern Louisiana. The area is one of the few remaining bottomland, hardwood areas remaining in northwest Louisiana. The terrain is flat with approximately 90 percent of the area being subject to annual flooding from backwaters of the Red River.
The original land purchased consisted of approximately half over-grazed cattle pasture and half severely over-grazed, poor quality, bottomland forest. Wildlife Division personnel recognized the need for improving the forest component of the area. In response to the need several hundred acres of agricultural fields were planted in the early 1970's and 1980's in preferred oak species. As a result of their foresight and efforts the seedlings planted over two decades ago are now producing quality hardwood mast and shelter for the expanding squirrel and turkey populations and other wildlife now utilizing the area.
Dominant tree species are hackberry, ash, elm, honey locust. native wild pecan, overcup, water, willow and Nuttall oak. The latter four species are not in abundance but are sparsely scattered throughout the forest area. Several hundred acres of the open fields have been planted in native pecan, Nuttall, water and cherrybark oak seedlings. Underplanting of the same seedlings has been done in the forested areas. The understory consists of red haws, rattan, trumpet vine and dewberry. In the field areas poison ivy, vetch and fescue predominate along with hardwood and honey locust spouts. Annually, approximately 50 acres are either fallow disked or planted in annual supplemental food plots.
White-tailed deer, squirrel, rabbits and raccoon hunting opportunities are available on the area. Archery hunting for white-tailed deer is the featured activity with a limited amount of modern firearm and muzzleloader hunting permitted. Pope and Young quality deer are common on the area. Waterfowl hunting is featured in the 110 acres greentree reservoir and on the numerous sloughs, beaver ponds and backwater areas. Hunting for eastern wild turkey is limited to lottery only. Trapping for raccoon, beaver, mink, coyote, and other furbears is allowed and encouraged.
 
Sport and commercial fishing is permitted on the area with fishermen concentrating their efforts on catfish, gar, buffalo and carp in Loggy and Red Chute Bayous. Bass and several species of bream can also be found in the bayous. One improved boat ramp is located on the southern portion of the area on Loggy Bayou.
The area is open to bird watchers and nature study groups. Overnight camping is allowed throughout the entire year on designated camping areas.
Additional information may be obtained from the LDWF, Wildlife Division, 1401 Talton St., Minden, LA 71055. Phone (318) 371-3050.

Jackson Bienville WMA

Information
Owned: 
Weyerhaeuser Company
Acreage: 
25,089 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Jackson Bienville Wildlife Management Area is located in Bienville, Jackson and Lincoln parishes, 12 miles south of Ruston in North Central Louisiana. Numerous access routes are available for entering the area with the major access being U. S. Highway 167 and Louisiana Highway 147. Jackson Bienville is comprised of 25,089 acres of forestland owned by Weyerhaeuser.  There is an extensive system of gravel roads that is available for use by the public. Limited ATV use is allowed on marked ATV trails.
The terrain on Jackson Bienville WMA is primarily gently rolling hills bordering Dugdemona River and five intermittent streams. Approximately 10 to 20 percent of the area can be considered bottomland. Weyerhaeuser intensively manages the area for timber. Habitat is highly diverse due to the varying timber harvest schedule, the interspersion of the hardwood areas, and over 33 miles of utilities rights-of-ways. Adding to the diversity is the substantial acreage Weyerhaeuser has committed to providing nesting and feeding habitat for numerous colonies of red-cockaded woodpeckers, a federally endangered species. Major habitat improvements are derived from a prescribed burning program conducted by Weyerhaeuser associated with their management for red-cockaded woodpeckers.
Forest cover is predominantly pine, except in the bottomland regions where water, willow, overcup, and cow oak, sweet and black gum, beech, and various other species of hardwoods dominate.
Understory vegetation, which is dense, consists of a variety of shrubs, vines, and annuals. Species comprising the understory area are French mulberry, hackberry, dogwood, honeysuckle, grape, muscadine, maple, sweetleaf, wax myrtle, blue beech, beggarweed, and greenbriar.
White-tailed deer, eastern wild turkeys, bobwhite quail, squirrels, and rabbits, are the major species hunted on the area. Limited hunting opportunities for woodcock, dove and waterfowl can also be found. Substantial success has been made to improve the habitat for bobwhite quail and eastern wild turkey with noticeable increases in those populations being seen. Trapping for furbearers is allowed.
Due to the diversified habitat on the area numerous resident and migratory species of birds use the area. Wildlife viewing is a major activity and easily enjoyed from the extensive road system and intersecting rights-of-ways. Camping areas are privately operated and located along Louisiana Highway 147.
Additional information may be obtained from the LDWF, Wildlife Division, 9961 Hwy. 80, Minden, LA 71055. Phone (318) 371-3050.

Syndicate content