DeSoto


Crew, Travis

Name: 
Crew, Travis
City: 
Bossier City
Phone: 
(318)464-5718
Phone: 
(318)683-6297
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Coyote, Raccoon

Strait, Jason

Name: 
Strait, Jason
City: 
Denton
Phone: 
(817) 475-4240
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All

Walker, Bruce

Name: 
Walker, Bruce
City: 
Mooringsport
Phone: 
318-453-8811
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All

Alexander, James

Name: 
Alexander, James
City: 
Mooringsport
Phone: 
318-996-0545
Phone: 
318-464-0213
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All

Brumley, Micheal

Name: 
Brumley, Micheal
City: 
Hosston
Phone: 
318-218-1639
Phone: 
318-458-5215
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All, no bats or bees

Lee, Ellis D.

Name: 
Lee, Ellis D.
City: 
Shreveport
Phone: 
318-687-8606
Phone: 
318-469-7505
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Beaver, otter, nutria, feral hog

Baez, Enrique

Name: 
Baez, Enrique
City: 
Bossier City
Phone: 
318-747-7511
Phone: 
318-752-9422
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All

Bayou Pierre

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
2,212 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Description:
Bayou Pierre Wildlife Management Area is located in extreme northwest Red River and east-central Desoto Parishes, 20 miles south of Shreveport. Primary access routes to the area are Red River Parish Road 410 and Yearwood Road off of Louisiana Highway 1. The Department maintains a limited system of regular and restricted-use ATV trails. Parish maintained roads also provide access to and through the area.
Bayou Pierre WMA lies in the Red River Alluvial Valley and is comprised of approximately 2,212 acres with Bayou Pierre bisecting the area. The area contains soil that drains poorly and is subject to periodic annual flooding. The terrain is essentially flat with only a five feet change in elevation across the entire area. There are drainages, wet weather ponds, sloughs, reforested areas, grasslands and supplemental food plots that create habitat favorable to supporting a diversified wildlife community.
The original bottomland hardwood forest on the area was cleared and the area drained in an attempt to convert the area to farming during the mid-1900?s. Following several failed farming attempts the area was deeded to the Department in 1992.
The Department has developed wildlife habitat featuring four distinct types, a 160 acre moist soil waterfowl refuge, 800 acres in ridge and swale / reforested bottomland hardwoods, a 200 plus acres reforested hardwood area and the remaining acreage being managed in planted dove fields and open grasslands. The wildlife habitat on the area has benefited from several cooperative projects among the Department and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, Quail Unlimited, American Energy Producers and the USDA?s Natural Resources Conservation Service.
White-tailed deer, rabbits, squirrel, raccoon, snipe, waterfowl and dove hunting opportunities are available on the area. Deer, squirrel and raccoon hunting are limited due to the young age of the reforested hardwood area. Waterfowl hunting is very limited due to the small acreage and the Department?s effort to have the area serve as a migration refuge for waterfowl during the winter months. High concentrations of snipe use the area during late winter months when local rainfall allows for sheeting of shallow water and saturated soil conditions. Trapping is allowed on the area except in the waterfowl refuge. Dove hunting opportunities range form excellent to fair depending on dove migrations and agricultural practices on the surrounding farms. Dove hunters should scout the area during the later portions of the dove seasons when winter cold fronts push additional flights of doves into the area and hunting pressure is generally very light.
Bayou Pierre WMA is a well-known birdwatching area from early fall throughout winter and during the northward spring migration. The area is noted as an excellent area to see hawks and owls during the winter months. Also, white-throated, white-crowned, chipping, field, fox and song sparrows are regular winter residents. Red-tailed hawks, northern harriers and American kestrels are also common. Spring transient warblers include the yellow, Tennessee, black-throated green and magnolia. Common summer nesters on the area are scissor-tailed flycatchers. Numerous species of reptiles, amphibians and insects can also be found utilizing the diversified habitat.
Camping areas are not available on the area.
 
Additional information may be obtained from the LDWF, Wildlife Division, 1401 Talton St., Minden, LA 71055.

Shortleaf Pine/Oak-Hickory Forest

New State Rank: 
S1
GRANK: 
G2G3
SRANK: 
S2S3
Class: 
Terrestrial

Saline Prairie

New State Rank: 
S2
GRANK: 
G1G2
SRANK: 
S1
Class: 
Terrestrial
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