St. Mary


Borel, Blake, J&J Exterminating

Name: 
Borel, Blake, J&J Exterminating
City: 
Lafayette
Phone: 
337-234-2847
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and snakes

Smith, Ryan J

Name: 
Smith, Ryan J
City: 
Berwick
Phone: 
985-397-3936
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Coyotes, bobcats, opossums, raccoons, armadillo, squirrels, hogs, “in the near future”.

Regard, William

Name: 
Regard, William
City: 
New Iberia
Phone: 
337-256-0042
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All species

Old Spanish Trail Phase II

Job Name: 
Old Spanish Trail Phase II
Seismic Contractor: 
Geokinetics Inc.

Franklin Gap 3D

Job Name: 
Franklin Gap 3D
Seismic Contractor: 
Geokinetics Inc.
Job Outline: 

Old Spanish Trail 3D

Job Name: 
Old Spanish Trail 3D
Seismic Contractor: 
Geokinetics Inc.
Public Notice: 
Job Outline: 

Girouard, Ronald

Name: 
Girouard, Ronald
City: 
Breaux Bridge
Phone: 
(337)332-2014
Phone: 
(337)962-4743
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Raccoons, Opossums, Squirrels, Skunks

Attakapas Island

Acreage

27,962

Contact

jhaynes@wlf.la.gov; 337-948-0255; 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, LA 70570

Parish

Iberia, St. Martin, St. Mary

Owner/manager

State of Louisiana, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Description

The state acquired Attakapas Island WMA in 1976. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also owns several tracts of land, including Shatters Bayou, that are managed as part of this WMA.

The WMA’s terrain is characterized by flat swampland subject to periodic flooding and silt from the Atchafalaya River. Areas adjacent to the river and spoil banks from dredging activities provide upland habitat and refuge areas during periods of high water. Many areas within the WMA have silted in; siltation will continue to increase the land-to-water ratio.

The primary overhead vegetation in the swamp is cypress and tupelo with some oak, maple, and hackberry growing in the upland areas. Black willow is prevalent on the newly deposited lands, which are numerous throughout the WMA. Understory vegetation in upland tracts includes blackberry, deciduous holly, elderberry, goldenrod, greenbriar, peppervine, pokeweed, palmetto, and switch cane. Common swamp plants include lizard tail, smartweed, coontail, and pennywort. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew heavily damaged the forest canopy on Attakapas Island WMA. LDWF reforested many of the higher areas along the Atchafalaya River with cypress; ash; elm; water, nuttall, cherrybark, and cow oak; and other upland species.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include white-tailed deer, rabbit, squirrel, waterfowl, and turkey. There is a youth-only season for deer. Trapping is allowed for furbearing animals. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Attakapas Island WMA is popular for fishing. Crawfish are found throughout the spillway; catfish, mullet, bass, bluegill, gar, bowfin, and freshwater drum are also common. See regulations for details.

Birding: hawks, owls, shorebirds, and neotropical migrants

Camping: There are three primitive camping areas and one camping area with picnic tables and running water located on Martin Ridge Road near Myette Point.

Hiking: LDWF has created and maintains about 30 miles of trails around the reforested plots on the east and west sides of the Atchafalaya River.

Directions

Attakapas Island WMA is located about 20 miles northwest of Morgan City and 10 miles northeast of Franklin. You can only access Attakapas Island WMA by boat. Nearby public launches include:

  • Myette Point boat launch on Martin Ridge Road off Hwy 87
  • Northeast of Charenton off Hwy 326, Charenton Beach Boat Launch
  • Above Morgan City on Hwy 70
  • Off Hwy 75 at Bayou Pigeon landing in Iberville Parish.

Atchafalaya Delta

Acreage

137,695

Contact

dleblanc@wlf.la.gov; 337-373-0032

Parish

St. Mary

Owned/managed by

State of Louisiana

Description

Located at the mouths of the Atchafalaya River and the Wax Lake Outlet, Atchafalaya Delta WMA mostly consists of open water in Atchafalaya Bay. Within the bay, two deltas (Main Delta and Wax Lake Delta) have formed from the accretion of sediments from the Atchafalaya River and from dredged material deposited by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Main Delta has about 15,000 acres of marsh and scrubby habitat; Wax Lake Delta has about 12,000 acres of marsh.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Deer hunting is not permitted on Wax Lake Delta; deer hunting on Main Delta is restricted to adult archery hunting and annual youth lottery gun hunts. Harvest per unit effort on deer is extremely high. Waterfowl and rabbit hunting and fur trapping are also permitted. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Atchafalaya Delta WMA is popular for fishing, especially for redfish, catfish, bass, and bluegill. See regulations for details.

Camping: Atchafalaya Delta WMA has two campgrounds with primitive restrooms. There are also a number of pilings available for houseboat mooring. You must have a permit for overnight mooring (16-day or hunting season permit). You may obtain hunting season overnight mooring privileges via a 5-year lease or lottery. Year-round mooring is prohibited.

Other: birding

Directions

You can only access Atchafalaya Delta WMA by boat. It is located about 25 miles south of Morgan City and Calumet.

Salt Dome Hardwood Forest

GRANK: 
G1
SRANK: 
S1
Class: 
Terrestrial
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