Boating

application/pdf icon The Economic Benefits of Fisheries, Wildlife and Boating Resources in the State of Louisiana (1997)

Marine Event Permit Form

Permit : 
Marine Event Permit Form
Description: 

LDWF issues marine event permits for any organized event held on the water that introduces extra or unusual safety hazards on navigable waterways. Permit forms must be turned in to LDWF at least 30 days prior to any event.

Contact Lt. Clay Marques at cmarques@wlf.la.gov for any questions.

Application: 

Pearl River Man Cited for Second Offense D.W.I. in Lake Pontchartrain

Release Date: 08/25/2010

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents arrested a Pearl River man for allegedly driving a motorboat while under the influence (DWI) of alcohol on Aug. 21 in St. Tammany Parish.

LDWF Agents Austin Arteaga and Jared McIver were on patrol in Lake Pontchartrain near the Interstate 10 twin span when they observed a vessel driven by Kip E. Asmos traveling northbound towards Eden Isles. Agents Arteaga and McIver made contact with the vessel and performed a boating safety inspection. The agents observed Asmos drinking a beer and a five-gallon bucket full of empty beer cans in the boat.

Agents conducted a field sobriety test and after further questioning placed Asmos under arrest and transported him to the St. Tammany Parish Jail for second offense DWI.

The penalty for second offense DWI is a fine between $750 and $1,000, and imprisonment between 30 days and six months.

Agents participating in the case were Senior Agent Austin Arteaga and Sgt. Jared McIver.

For more information, contact Capt. Steve McManus at 504-284-2023 or smcmanus@wlf.la.gov.
2010-E48  

Buckhorn

Map: 

Acreage

11,121

Contact

mmcgee@wlf.la.gov; 318-343-4044; 368 CenturyLink Dr, Monroe, LA 71203

Parish

Tensas

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

LDWF purchased the majority of Buckhorn WMA in 1995 and added about 2,400 acres of cultivated farmland to the WMA between 2001 and 2003. LDWF has reforested the majority of Buckhorn WMA and manages a portion as wetlands.

The terrain on Buckhorn WMA is made up of undulating ridges and swales, with elevations ranging from 50 to 70 feet above sea level. Six small bayous flow through the area, providing approximately 13 miles of waterways. There are also six small lakes, approximately 200 acres, on Buckhorn WMA; all are subject to backwater flooding from the Tensas River. The bayous and lakes receive turbid runoff from the surrounding agricultural areas.

The main tree species on Buckthorn WMA are willow, nuttall, overcup, and water oak; sweetgum; green ash; persimmon; sugarberry; honey locust; sweet and bitter pecan; elm; cypress; and tupelo gum. The understory is extremely dense throughout the WMA; understory species include palmetto, switchcane, rattan, Rubus sp., Crataegus sp., buttonbush, swamp dogwood, Vitis sp., deciduous holly, Smilax sp., baccharis, poison ivy, and many herbaceous species.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Buckhorn WMA’s most popular game species are white-tailed deer, squirrel, and rabbit. There is a youth deer season and lottery hunt. Waterfowl, woodcock, snipe, and raccoon hunting are also available. In fact, the areas managed for waterfowl, along with the sloughs and waterways, offer excellent waterfowl hunting. See regulations for details.

Physically challenged wheelchair-confined hunting areas are available on Buckhorn WMA. There is also a physically challenged deer season. Click here for a physically challenged hunter permit application and additional information.

Fishing and boating: Boat launches are available on most area lakes. Recreational fishing for freshwater fish, including largemouth bass, crappie, sunfish, and catfish, crawfishing, and frogging are available; however, fishing is limited by lack of available aquatic habitat. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Recognized by the American Bird Conservancy as an Important Birding Area, Buckthorn WMA is visited by many neotropical bird and shorebird species annually and is home to large numbers of passerine and wading birds. The areas managed for waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds, along with the sloughs and waterways, offer excellent birding opportunities. Birders frequently observe bald eagles and their nests in this area.

Louisiana black bear frequent Buckthorn WMA; reported sightings have been increasing. Black bear research is ongoing at Buckhorn WMA.

Hiking: The 1-1/2-mile Brushy Lake Nature Trail located adjacent to Clydesdale Road provides a unique opportunity for users to enjoy both aquatic and terrestrial aspects of the bottomland hardwood ecosystem. Several walking trails follow pipeline rights-of-way.

Other: horseback riding, berry picking

Directions

Buckthorn WMA is located 14 miles west of St. Joseph. Access routes include LA Hwy 4 and 128 and parish roads such as Clydesdale Road and Honeysuckle Lane. LDWF maintains a system of all-weather gravel roads and several ATV trails that provide access to area users. There are four self-clearing permit stations located at major entrances to the area.

Bodcau

Acreage

33,766

Contact

jjohnson@wlf.la.gov; 318-371-3050; 9961 Hwy 80, Minden, LA 71055

Parish

Bossier, Webster

Owner/manager

Owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; managed by LDWF through long-term licensing agreements

Description

Bodcau WMA gets its name from Bodcau Bayou, the major bayou that bisects it from its northernmost point at the Arkansas-Louisiana state line to its southernmost tip nearly 30 miles to the south. The area is long and narrow with an average width of 1-1/2 miles. Ivan Lake is on Bodcau WMA, and there is also a manmade dam and seasonal flood reservoir which were built to control downstream flooding.

Bodcau WMA contains a wide range of wildlife habitat ranging from cypress swamps to upland pine and hardwood forests interspersed with grasslands and open fields. Many species of grasses and forbs typically found in states west of Louisiana can be found growing in the grassland areas. There are numerous seasonally flooded sloughs, beaver ponds, and large areas of flatland, bottomland, hardwood forests. The bottomland forest rapidly merges with the upland forest on a series of ridges that extend into the bottomland area.

The main bottomland tree species include bald cypress and water, overcup, willow, and cow oaks. Shortleaf and loblolly pine; white, red, and cherrybark oaks; sweetgum; and elm trees dominate upland forests. Understory species in the bottomland area include poison ivy, honeysuckle, rattan, buttonbush, and swamp privet. Upland understory species include blackberry, honeysuckle, poison ivy, beautyberry, and sawbriar.

LDWF, in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, manages and develops habitat on Bodcau WMA through prescribed burning, fallow disking, supplemental food plantings, water level manipulation, and timber harvest. These practices help to provide quality habitat for game and non-game species.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include white-tailed deer (both archery and modern firearms), squirrel, rabbit, dove, quail, and all other species of small game. The deer herd is considered healthy. Waterfowl hunting is available in the 1,600 acre greentree reservoir and in the numerous sloughs and backwater flooded areas. Turkey hunting is also allowed during a short spring gobbler season. There are youth-only deer, squirrel, and turkey seasons. See regulations for details.

Shooting range: There is a free, public shooting range with a rifle range with targets from 25 to 200 yards, a pistol range with 25-yard targets, and a shotgun station. The range is supervised by an approved range officer. Click here for more information, email tbuffington@wlf.la.gov, or call 318-326-3225.

Fishing and boating: Fishing and small boating are available on Ivan Lake. Bass and bream fishing are excellent on Bodcau Bayou and its overflow; crawfish are also abundant during certain years. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Great blue herons, several species of hawks, and barred, horned and screech owls are common on Bodcau WMA. Yellow, black and white, yellow-throated, magnolia, prairie, and yellow-rumped warblers are regularly seen on the area. Numerous species of reptiles, amphibians, and insects are common as well.

Camping: Camping is available at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers improved camping area located on the south end of Bodcau WMA and at several primitive camping areas.

Directions

Bodcau WMA is located approximately 17 miles northeast of Bossier City. Travel north on LA Hwy 157 from I-20 at Haughton to Bellevue, then follow the signs to Bodcau WMA. ATVs and UTVs are permitted on a seasonal basis (September 1 through the end of February) on numerous marked trails on the WMA. A small number of these trails are open year-round for access to additional fishing locations.

Biloxi

Map: 

Acreage

42,747

Contact

sgranier@wlf.la.gov; 504-284-5264

Parish

St. Bernard

Owner/manager

Owned by Biloxi Marsh Lands Corporation; leased to and managed by LDWF

Description

Biloxi WMA is a low brackish to saline marsh. Major vegetation includes marsh hay cordgrass, black rush, hog cane, smooth cordgrass, saltgrass, glasswort, and three square. There are a few oak trees on old ridges. Widgeon grass is the main submerged aquatic plant.

Due to Biloxi WMA’s tremendous number of bayous, sloughs, and potholes, the area is home to an abundance of fish, shrimp, crabs, waterfowl, and furbearers. There are a few canal spoil banks and ridges scattered throughout the marsh which provide birds and mammals refuge from rising water levels during storms or high tides.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Popular game species on Biloxi WMA include rabbits, rails, gallinules, snipe, ducks (lesser scaup, teal, wigeon, gadwall, shoveler, mottled, pintail, and mallard), and geese (blue and snow). There is an archery only deer season as well. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Common fish species on Biloxi WMA include speckled trout, redfish, black drum, sheepshead, flounder, and croaker. Both recreational and commercial fishermen harvest large amounts of crab and shrimp in this area. See regulations for details.

Other: birding

Directions

Biloxi WMA is located about 40 miles east of New Orleans. The area is accessible only by boat via commercial launches at Hopedale and Shell Beach.

Big Lake

Map: 

Acreage

19,231

Contact

mmcgee@wlf.la.gov; 318-343-4044; 368 CenturyLink Dr, Monroe, LA 71203

Parish

Franklin, Tensas, Madison

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

The eastern boundary of Big Lake WMA is contiguous with a portion of the western boundary of Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge. Together, these areas form one of the largest remaining tracts of the vast bottomland hardwood forest that historically composed the lower Mississippi River floodplain from lower Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico. LDWF purchased the area through the Rockefeller Fund in three components between 1983 and 1985 (9,833 acres in 1983, 4,888 acres in 1984, and 4,510 acres in 1985).

Big Lake WMA is flat with some ridges and generally poorly drained; terrain varies from 55 to 65 feet above sea level. The area floods seasonally, depending on water levels of the Tensas River, and periodically after heavy rainful. Abandoned and active mineral exploration and production sites, roadways, pipelines, and open water lakes, sloughs, and bayous provide diversity throughout the area’s terrain. There are seven small lakes and six small bayous, making up approximately 200 acres and 25 miles of waterways, respectively.

The forested area of Big Lake WMA consists of relatively closed overstory canopy with a fairly dense understory. Major tree species include nuttall, water, willow, and overcup oak; American and cedar elm; sweetgum; bitter pecan; honey locust; sugarberry; willow; sycamore; persimmon; red maple; box elder; and cypress. The understory includes rattan, Rubus sp., Crataegus sp., swamp dogwood, Vitis sp., deciduous holly, elderberry, Smilax sp., baccharis, switchcane, poison ivy, and many herbaceous species.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: The most popular game species on Big Lake WMA are white-tailed deer, squirrels, rabbits, and turkey. There are youth-only deer and turkey seasons. There are also limited waterfowl and woodcock hunting opportunities. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Boat launches are available on most of the area’s lakes. Recreational fishing for largemouth bass, crappie, sunfish, and catfish, crawfishing, and frogging are popular with area users. See regulations for details.

Camping: There are no public camping areas on Big Lake WMA; however, campsites are available to the public for a fee on adjacent private property.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Recognized by the American Bird Conservancy as an important site, Big Lake WMA is home to large numbers of passerine birds, and many neotropical bird species visit the area every year. Birders regularly observe bald eagles and osprey.

Big Lake WMA and Tensas National Wildlife Refuge are home to a thriving population of Louisiana black bear. Reported sightings are steadily increasing, and black bear research is ongoing in this entire area.

Hiking: The 1-mile Trusler Lake Hiking Trail is located on the interior of Big Lake WMA. Several walking trails follow pipeline rights-of-way.

Other: horseback riding, berry picking

Directions

Big Lake WMA is located 12 miles east of Gilbert. Major access routes include LA Hwy 4 and 610. LDWF maintains a system of all-weather gravel roads and numerous ATV trails that provide access to area users. There are four self-clearing permit stations at major entrances to the area.

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